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Malawi First Country to Put HIV Positive Pregnant Women On ARVs

President Arthur Peter Mutharika says Malawi was the first country to adopt a policy of putting all HIV positive pregnant and breast feeding women on anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs regardless of their CD4 Count.

Published
16 hours ago
From
AllAfrica
Aiming For HIV's Weak Spot - The new generation of gp120 entry inhibitors

A small molecule (green) binds within a cavity on the HIV protein gp120. Amino acid residues that contribute only to binding affinity are colored blue, and those that contribute strongly to binding as well as the protein's conformational change are ...

Published
17 hours ago
From
C&EN - Chemical and Engineering News
Beyond the Berlin patient – seeking a cure for HIV-AIDS

Researchers from many corners of the world, including the Nobel Prize winning co-discoverer of the AIDS virus Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, are in Seattle this week to explore the possibility of curing people of HIV.

Published
28 August 2014
From
Humanosphere
Dosage of HIV drug may be ineffective for half of African-Americans

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc. The initial dosing studies included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body, resulting in higher concentrations of the drug in the blood. The current study shows that people with maximum levels of the protein CYP3A5 -- including nearly half of African-Americans -- end up with lower levels of maraviroc in their bodies.

Published
28 August 2014
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
HIV Antibodies Block Infection by Reservoir-Derived Virus in Laboratory Study

The researchers conclude that passive immunotherapy involving bNAbs individually or in combination may control HIV in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. A number of clinical trials are already underway or planned to test this hypothesis.

Published
27 August 2014
From
National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases press release
Novel immune-suppressant vaccine completely blocks HIV infection in monkeys: human trials planned

A novel and relatively simple vaccine that can be administered orally has managed to completely block rectal infection with SIV, the monkey equivalent of HIV, in rhesus

Published
26 August 2014
By
Gus Cairns
Three Approaches to Beating the AIDS Epidemic in South Africa

South Africa’s AIDS epidemic is at its worst in high-risk subgroups like gay men, prostitutes, truckers, prisoners, miners and patients who don’t take their drugs regularly. To have any hope of beating the epidemic, it must focus on such groups, experts say. Many pilot projects to do that have been started with aid from the United States government program called Pepfar. Here are some of them.

Published
26 August 2014
From
New York Times
A voice for HIV cure: Scientists, activists gather for Hutch conference

Matt Sharp is no scientist. But when he joins researchers from around the country tomorrow for a conference on using gene therapy to cure HIV, he will bring a perspective that few others in the room can match.

Published
26 August 2014
From
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center press release
FDA Approves New Single-Tablet HIV Regimen, Triumeq

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Triumeq, ViiV Healthcare's single-tablet, triple-combination antiretroviral (ARV) regimen, as a first-line therapy to treat HIV. The tablet is comprised of the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (Tivicay) plus abacavir and lamivudine (Kivexa/Epzicom) and is the first single-tablet regimen to receive approval that does not contain tenofovir.

Published
26 August 2014
From
Aidsmeds.com
Protein tethers HIV and Ebola to cells

A family of proteins that helps viruses, such as HIV and Ebola, enter a cell also can block the release of those viruses. When HIV-1 or any virus infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. One type of cellular protein—T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1—has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. Researchers have now discovered that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of such viruses. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “This is a surprising finding that provides new insights into our understanding of not only HIV infection, but also that of Ebola and other viruses,” says Shan-Lu Liu, associate professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at University of Missouri.

Published
26 August 2014
From
Futurity
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