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Are We Punishing Diseases or Punishing People? An Interview With Trevor Hoppe

The movement to end laws that criminalize people living with HIV for exposure or transmission has gained momentum in the U.S. in recent years. However, HIV is by no means the first disease to be used to target marginalized people who happen to be living with it. TheBody.com sat down with Trevor Hoppe, Ph.D., an assistant professor of sociology with the University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNY), to discuss his new book, Punishing Disease: HIV and the Criminalization of Sickness (University of California Press, 2017).

Published
11 December 2017
From
The Body
When HIV is criminalized: Rosemary Namubiru, nurse living with HIV

Rosemary Namubiru is a 67-year-old nurse living with HIV. She is a mother, grandmother and IAS Member. She was wrongfully accused of intentionally exposing a child to HIV while administering an injection in January 2014. The child did not acquire HIV. However, the accusations created a media firestorm, and she was arrested live on television. Originally charged with attempted murder, she was eventually convicted of criminal negligence. However, on appeal, the judge found that her initial three-year sentence was excessive and ordered her release after she served 10 months in prison. This is her story …

Published
08 December 2017
From
International AIDS Society
Police accused of exaggerating risks of HIV to introduce spit guards

A police force has been accused of fear mongering and stigmatising sufferers of hepatitis C and HIV by playing up the risks of transmission of blood-borne viruses as a reason to introduce spit guards.

Published
20 November 2017
From
The Guardian
Daryll Rowe guilty – but is criminal law the right way to stop the spread of HIV?

The trial has provoked much media comment, and his behaviour widespread condemnation – the details of Rowe’s actions, after all, are particularly shocking. But whatever judgement we might pass on Rowe’s behaviour from a moral or ethical perspective, the criminalisation of HIV transmission and exposure more generally raises a number of important questions, not least regarding its impact on HIV-related stigma and efforts to reduce, and ultimately eradicate, the virus.

Published
19 November 2017
From
The Conversation
Daryll Rowe continued to spread HIV while on bail

Police have come under fire over claims they put gay men in danger when they released a hairdresser on bail, allowing him to continue a campaign to deliberately infect his lovers with HIV.

Published
17 November 2017
From
Metro
This Is What It's Like To Be One Of The Men Infected By HIV In Britain's First Case Of Deliberate Transmission

Despite the nature of Rowe’s crimes, and the multiple tabloid headlines surrounding this case screaming about an already highly stigmatised condition, this is not really a story about HIV. The virus was merely Rowe’s weapon of choice. This is a story about abuse.

Published
16 November 2017
From
Buzzfeed
Daryll Rowe guilty of infecting men with HIV

A man has been convicted of trying to infect 10 men with HIV in a "campaign" to infect as many as possible.

Published
15 November 2017
From
BBC News
Brighton hairdresser's HIV strain 'closely related' to victims'

Six men who accuse a hairdresser of infecting them with HIV have a strain so similar it is "consistent" with him being the source, a court has heard.

Published
31 October 2017
From
BBC News
Italian man sentenced to jail for infecting 30 women with HIV

An HIV-positive man has been sentenced to 24 years in jail for infecting at least 30 women despite knowing his status. The Italian man convinced women to have unprotected sex with him by saying he'd recently been tested.

Published
30 October 2017
From
Deutsche Welle
Analysis: A Closer Look at Yesterday’s Ohio Supreme Court Ruling Rejecting First Amendment and Equal Protection Challenges in State v. Batista

On October 26, 2017, the Ohio Supreme Court affirmed Orlando Batista’s conviction for felonious assault under R.C. 2903.11(B)(1), which makes it a serious crime for a person living with HIV to have sex without first disclosing their status to a sexual partner.

Published
30 October 2017
From
The Center for HIV Law and Policy
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

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