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Not So Fast: Do people with HIV really experience accelerated aging?

Recent talk about HIV and aging has almost always been scary. A number of studies conclude that people living with HIV have so-called “accelerated aging”—meaning they will suffer heart attacks, strokes, cancers, and osteoporosis more often and sooner than those without HIV. Well, this is one article on aging and HIV that will challenge the concept of people living with HIV having an early expiration date. Instead, we can look at what we know and what we don’t, to get a better idea of what the risks are for HIV-positive people growing older—and what they can do about them.

Published
08 July 2016
From
Positively Aware
Risk of heart attack rises with length of HIV infection, regardless of age

Ten years after becoming infected with HIV, a person living with HIV has approximately twice the risk of heart attack compared to someone who has just acquired

Published
27 October 2015
By
Keith Alcorn
Study Links Fitness Level and HIV-related Dementia

A new study shows that fitness level in HIV infected individuals is related to cognitive impairment. These results suggest that something as simple as exercise may be able to stave off neurological decline in this growing segment of the aging population.

Published
16 December 2013
From
University of Rochester Medical Center
High prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in young men with HIV

There is an increased prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in young HIV-positive men, Spanish researchers report in the online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency

Published
29 October 2013
By
Michael Carter
Exercise helps with better brain functioning in HIV-infected adults

Regular exercise is not only good for health, but can give people living with HIV a significant mental boost. This is according to a study by Dr. David J. Moore and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, published in Springer's Journal of NeuroVirology. The study found that HIV-infected adults who exercise suffered significantly less neurocognitive impairment compared to patients who do not exercise.

Published
14 August 2013
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Traditional risk factors strongest predictors of sub-clinical cardiovascular disease in people about to start HIV therapy

Sub-clinical cardiovascular disease in people with HIV is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for heart disease rather than inflammation or HIV-related parameters, US research

Published
17 December 2012
By
Michael Carter
Exercise Guidelines Published for People with HIV Over 50

A combination of aerobic and resistance exercises, three times a week for at least six weeks, is recommended to improve cardiovascular, metabolic and muscle function in people living with HIV older than 50 years of age, according to suggested guidelines published ahead of print by the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care.

Published
17 August 2011
From
AIDSMeds.com
Diet, exercise and cancer screening boosted by 'highly feasible' intervention targeted at HIV serodiscordant couples

Fruit and vegetable consumption and exercise frequency can be increased by participation in a health promotion intervention designed to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, investigators report

Published
11 May 2011
By
Michael Carter
That feel-good factor: exercise and HIV

Derek Thaczuk gets off the couch and finds out about exercise and HIV.

Published
01 February 2010
From
HIV treatment update
Why fit is happy: exercise, mood and HIV

The team here at NAM will be taking part in a couple of fundraising events this summer involving exercise. At the less demanding end of the scale,

Published
01 May 2009
From
HIV treatment update
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.