Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Elimination of hepatitis C news

Show

From To
Australian experience shows high DAA uptake and rapid fall in rates of HCV viraemia among people who inject drugs

Providing hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to people who inject drugs can achieve rapid reductions in community prevalence of viraemia, according

Published
28 November 2018
By
Michael Carter
Hepatitis C elimination in people living with HIV in the UK is feasible by 2021, British HIV Association says

Hepatitis C co-infection can be eliminated in people living with HIV in the United Kingdom by 2021, the British HIV Association (BHIVA) said today. “The UK can be

Published
10 October 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Hepatitis C in England: 2018 report

In this report, we summarise the impact of action plans in England to drive down mortality from HCV, reduce the number of new infections, and outline the actions required to make further progress.

Published
08 May 2018
From
Public Health England
Routine clinical use of DAAs highly effective and safe in people with HIV/HCV in Europe

“Real life” data from across Europe shows that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) cure hepatitis C in the vast majority of people with HIV and hepatitis C

Published
19 April 2018
By
Michael Carter
Eliminating Hepatitis C in England

England will not fulfil its commitment to elimination of hepatitis C by 2030 unless the number of people diagnosed and initiated onto treatment is greatly increased.

Published
23 March 2018
From
All-Party Parliamentary Group on Liver Health
Systematic Hep C Test-and-Treat Lowers Rate in Gay Men With HIV

A Swiss research program tested for and treated hep C in a large cohort of HIV-positive men who have sex with men over time.

Published
22 March 2018
From
Poz
WHO urges countries to scale up hepatitis C treatment

A new WHO report shows that the annual number of people receiving hepatitis C cure increased from around 1 million in 2015 to 1.5 million in 2016. However, global access to hepatitis C treatment remains uneven, with Egypt and Pakistan accounting for about half of all people starting direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment to cure hepatitis C in 2016.

Published
09 March 2018
From
World Health Organization
Hepatitis C drugs not being accessed by thousands of Australians with the disease

Hundreds of thousands of Australians with hepatitis C are failing to access new curative drugs, despite the Government subsidising them at huge cost to the taxpayer. The trend means the Government is at risk of missing its target to eradicate hepatitis C and of spending far more than necessary on the treatments.

Published
12 February 2018
From
ABC News
Harm reduction scale-up needed to eliminate HCV in people who inject drugs, European model predicts

Elimination of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs in Europe will require simultaneous scale-up of direct-acting antiviral treatment, needle and syringe programmes (NSP) and

Published
01 February 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
NHS England seeks drug price cuts to eliminate hepatitis C by 2025

NHS England announced this week that it aims to eliminate hepatitis C by 2025 – if it can negotiate 'best value for money' deals with the pharmaceutical

Published
30 January 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
← First12Next →

Filter by country

Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.