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Free new tool for health providers to assist physical rehabilitation in people living with HIV

The free website, entitled "How Rehabilitation Can Help People Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Evidence-Informed Tool for Rehab Providers", was adapted from a Canadian resource and is also downloadable for use on paper. It's designed to be a one-stop resource for physiotherapists, occupational therapists and other health workers who can quickly and easily research the most common HIV-related disabilities, and find evidence-based rehabilitation solutions

Published
02 December 2015
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
START sub-study shows more bone loss with earlier HIV treatment

Participants who started antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after HIV diagnosis in the large START trial showed a greater decrease in bone density at the hip and spine

Published
27 October 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
Tenofovir alafenamide single-tablet regimen shows good efficacy with improved kidney and bone safety

A single-tablet regimen containing the new tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) – to be marketed as Genvoya – suppressed HIV as well as a co-formulation containing the older tenofovir

Published
25 October 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
Modest bone loss seen in young men taking Truvada for pre-exposure prophylaxis

Young men participating in a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) demonstration project experienced modest but significant bone loss after starting Truvada, according to findings presented yesterday to a joint session

Published
22 October 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
TAF and TDF Compared for Kidney, Bone Toxicity in Black HIV+ Patients

Including tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) in single-tablet elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine (E/C/F/TAF) is associated with reduced renal and bone toxicity compared to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing single-tablet (E/C/F/TDF) therapy, according to an analysis of data from two Phase 3 trials, reported at IDWeek 2015.

Published
12 October 2015
From
Monthly Prescribing Reference
HIV Increases Bone Fracture Risk by 32% in Middle-Aged U.S. Women

HIV infection inflated the risk of a new fracture 32% in a mostly premenopausal group in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Older age, white race, previous fracture history, injection drug use, opiate use and smoking also independently raised the risk of any fracture in multivariate analysis.

Published
05 October 2015
From
The Body
Bone loss slows, but continues long-term in HIV-positive people on antiretroviral therapy

People with HIV experienced a decrease in bone density at the hip and spine during their first two years after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART). While bone loss

Published
14 September 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
Tenofovir Alafenamide Combo Pill Matches Truvada for HIV Efficacy, but Easier on Bones and Kidneys

A fixed-dose combination pill containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) worked as well in a Phase 3 trial as the current Truvada pill containing the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) -- which is used for both HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP -- but causes less kidney and bone toxicity, according to an announcement this week from Gilead Sciences.

Published
04 September 2015
From
HIVandHepatitis.com
Switching to new tenofovir alafenamide keeps virus in check and improves kidney and bone health

People who switch from the current version of tenofovir to tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) – a new formulation that reaches higher levels in HIV-infected cells – maintained undetectable

Published
28 July 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
ART: Daily Vitamin D and Calcium Stave Off Bone Loss

Patients with HIV infection who take antiretroviral therapy (ART) can also reduce antiretroviral therapy-related bone loss by 50% by taking daily high-dose vitamin D and calcium supplements, according to a 48-week study.

Published
17 June 2015
From
Medscape
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