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Adherence news

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Electronic monitoring of antiretroviral adherence in "real time" boosts pill taking and need for intensive adherence support

Electronic monitoring of antiretroviral adherence in “real time” significantly increases the proportion of treatment doses taken on time and reduces the frequency of treatment interruptions, according to a

Published
05 December 2016
By
Michael Carter
Behavioral Therapy Provides Depression and Adherence Benefits in HIV Study

Four months of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and antiretroviral adherence significantly improved adherence and depression scores when compared with treatment as usual in a three-way randomized trial involving adults with HIV infection. Relative improvements in adherence and depression held up in the eight months after the interventions ended.

Published
30 November 2016
From
The Body Pro
Four days on, three days off HIV treatment controls viral load in French pilot study

An experimental `four days on, three days off` antiretroviral regimen kept viral load fully suppressed in 96% of people for 48 weeks in a French study presented

Published
03 November 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
Rings, films or inserts? Researchers need to develop prevention products that make sense in women’s lives

“We need to think outside of the box,” Sharon Hillier of the Microbicide Trials Network told the HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P 2016) conference in Chicago

Published
21 October 2016
By
Roger Pebody
Less than 100% adherence to HIV therapy, even with viral suppression, can lead to more inflammation and immune activation

Research involving men taking antiretroviral therapy, all with an undetectable viral load, has shown that imperfect adherence to therapy is associated with higher levels of key markers of

Published
12 October 2016
By
Michael Carter
UNC Receives $18 Million to Combine Tech & Health

"iTech will be home to six studies with each study using technology to address a barrier to the HIV care continuum,” said Hightow-Weidman. “For youth at risk of becoming infected with HIV, we will develop apps that list HIV testing sites and medical providers who prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP to prevent HIV. For youth who test positive for the virus, we will develop electronic health interventions to engage them in care and improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy.”

Published
28 September 2016
From
University of North Carolina Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases
Four day a week ART: sub-optimal drug levels but few virological failures

A poster at IAS 2016 reported on the effectiveness of a strategy in France to use reduced dose maintenance therapy. This involved only taking ART for four rather than seven days a week.

Published
20 September 2016
From
HIV i-Base
Reducing clinic visits can support retention in HIV care, African studies show

Interventions which reduce the need for people to attend clinics are proving highly successful in retaining people in care and supporting adherence to HIV medication in southern

Published
26 July 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
Smartphone app could help high-risk HIV men stay on their meds

Dworkin created the app by gathering African-American HIV-infected men who have sex with men in focus groups and discussing the common treatment questions they wanted answers to and the appropriate language the app should use in responding.

Published
21 July 2016
From
Science Magazine
Sub-type C infection does not increase the risk of virologic failure when people are taking tenofovir-containing first-line ART

There is no evidence that HIV-positive people with sub-type C infection have an increased risk of treatment failure when receiving tenofovir-containing regimens, investigators from the UK report in

Published
08 June 2016
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.