How to create your drugs chart

My drugs chart provides information on all the anti-HIV drugs currently licensed for use in Europe.

  1. Select your chosen drugs and drag them onto the area called Drop pill here.

  2. Choose the number of pills taken with each dose and the time it should be taken.

  3. Review the information provided about each drug.

  4. Click the Print or save as PDF button to get a printable copy of the information.

Please visit the help pages if you would like more detailed information on how to create your chart.

Contact NAM to find out more about the scientific research and information used to produce this tool.

3TC

Also known as lamivudine, Epivir

abacavir

Also known as Ziagen

Aptivus

Also known as tipranavir

atazanavir

Also known as Reyataz

Atripla

AZT

Also known as zidovudine, Retrovir

Celsentri

Also known as maraviroc

Combivir

Crixivan

Also known as indinavir

d4T

Also known as stavudine, Zerit, Zerit PRC

darunavir

Also known as Prezista

ddI

Also known as didanosine, Videx EC

didanosine

Also known as ddI, Videx EC

Edurant

Also known as rilpivirine

efavirenz

Also known as Sustiva

emtricitabine

Also known as FTC, Emtriva

Emtriva

Also known as FTC, emtricitabine

enfuvirtide

Also known as T-20, Fuzeon

Epivir

Also known as 3TC, lamivudine

etravirine

Also known as Intelence

Eviplera

fosamprenavir

Also known as Telzir

FTC

Also known as emtricitabine, Emtriva

Fuzeon

Also known as T-20, enfuvirtide

indinavir

Also known as Crixivan

Intelence

Also known as etravirine

Invirase

Also known as saquinavir

Isentress

Also known as raltegravir

Kaletra

Also known as lopinavir/ritonavir

Kivexa

lamivudine

Also known as 3TC, Epivir

lopinavir/ritonavir

Also known as Kaletra

maraviroc

Also known as Celsentri

nevirapine

Also known as Viramune

nevirapine - prolonged release

Also known as Viramune prolonged-release

Norvir

Also known as ritonavir

Prezista

Also known as darunavir

raltegravir

Also known as Isentress

Retrovir

Also known as AZT, zidovudine

Reyataz

Also known as atazanavir

rilpivirine

Also known as Edurant

ritonavir

Also known as Norvir

saquinavir

Also known as Invirase

stavudine

Also known as d4T, Zerit, Zerit PRC

Sustiva

Also known as efavirenz

T-20

Also known as enfuvirtide, Fuzeon

Telzir

Also known as fosamprenavir

tenofovir

Also known as Viread

tipranavir

Also known as Aptivus

Trizivir

Truvada

Videx EC

Also known as ddI, didanosine

Viramune

Also known as nevirapine

Viramune prolonged-release

Also known as nevirapine - prolonged release

Viread

Also known as tenofovir

Zerit

Also known as d4T, stavudine, Zerit PRC

Zerit PRC

Also known as d4T, stavudine, Zerit

Ziagen

Also known as abacavir

zidovudine

Also known as AZT, Retrovir

 
Drop pill here
Name Pharmaceutical drugs are given several names. The name here is the one most commonly used for this drug. In the case of single drugs, it is the generic name common to all the drugs that have this particular chemical make-up. The generic name is usually the name of the active ingredient in the drug, but sometimes there will be a generic name in addition to the name of the active ingredient. For combination drugs, it is the brand name of that particular combination.  
Other names Pharmaceutical drugs are given several names. The name here is the brand name which belongs to a particular company. A brand name starts with a capital letter and may be written in italics or have an ® symbol.  
Drug class There are five main types (‘classes’) of antiretroviral drugs. Each class of drug attacks HIV at a different stage of the HIV lifecycle. Generally, drugs from two (or sometimes three) classes are combined to ensure a powerful attack on HIV. Some drugs are also available as fixed-dose combination pills.  
Summary This explains the individual drugs that make up a fixed-dose combination pill.  
Approved dosage The amount of the drug and the number of pills normally taken by people using this drug, and when they should be taken.  
Your dosage
Take pills
at
+ -
Dosage notes
Formulations  
Tips on taking it Information on anything people should or should not do when taking this drug, to ensure it is effective.  
Food restrictions Information on anything people should or should not eat or drink when taking this drug, or when they should eat or drink, to ensure it is effective.  
Warnings  
Common side-effects A side-effect which occurs in at least one in a hundred patients who take this drug.  
Rare side-effects A side-effect which occurs in fewer than one in a hundred patients who take this drug. This tool lists rare side-effects if they are potentially dangerous.  
Resistance The strains of HIV that reproduce when someone is taking HIV treatment (usually because the drugs are not being taken at the right time or in the right amount) can develop resistance to the drugs being taken. Resistance can mean that these drugs will no longer work properly against that strain of HIV.  
Drug interactions Taking two or more different drugs together may result in an alteration in the effectiveness (or side-effects) of one or more of the drugs being taken. Some drugs should not be taken in combination with certain anti-HIV drugs.  
Notes

Print or save as PDF

Drugs licensed in the European Union
This information was last reviewed on 11 March 2013. It is next due for review on 11 March 2015.