Side-effects: latest news

Side-effects resources

  • My drugs chart

    My drugs chart provides information on all the anti-HIV drugs currently licensed for use in Europe.Select your chosen drugs and drag them onto the area...

    From: My drugs chart

  • Antiretroviral drugs chart

    A one-page reference guide to the anti-HIV drugs licensed for use in the European Union, with information on formulation, dosing, key side-effects and food restrictions....

    From: Antiretroviral drugs chart

    Information level Level 1
  • HIV treatment in women

    The evidence available suggests that HIV treatment works well for women. Unless you are pregnant, the recommendations for HIV treatment are the same for both women and...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Like all medications, anti-HIV drugs can cause side-effects and these can be a reason why people don’t take their treatment properly. The risk of side-effects can vary between...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Like all medication, anti-HIV drugs can have side-effects. Read more here on what these are and how to deal with them if you experience side-effects....

    From: Living with HIV

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    The booklet provides information about possible side-effects of HIV treatment. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    We take medicines to make us better or to keep us well, but all medicines can cause unwanted secondary effects. These are usually called side-effects,...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Neuropathy - nerve pain

    Neuropathy is damage to the nerves. Nerves transmit signals within the brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system or CNS), and extend from the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Facial wasting

    New cases of facial wasting caused by anti-HIV drugs are now rare in the UK.Fat loss from the face is one of the components of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hyperbilirubinaemia

    Bilirubin is a waste product produced by the liver during the breakdown of old red blood cells. The technical term for abnormally high levels of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lactic acidosis

    Lactic acidosis is a serious side-effect of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) class of anti-HIV drugs. This class includes AZT (zidovudine, Retrovir), 3TC (lamivudine, Epivir), d4T...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Skin problems

    There are three main causes of skin problems in people with HIV: interactions between the immune system and HIV, infections, and side-effects of drugs. Some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pain

    Every day most of us will experience physical pain of some sort. For the most part it will cause only minor discomfort and won’t interfere...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Nausea and vomiting

    Nausea is a word for the feeling of wanting to vomit or be sick. Most people with HIV will experience nausea and vomiting at some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea is common among people with HIV. It can be a side-effect of anti-HIV drugs as well as some other medicines, such as antibiotics. Diarrhoea...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Tiredness and fatigue are common problems among people with HIV. There are many possible causes and treatments and there are also things you can do...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Changing treatment due to side-effects

    All drugs can cause side-effects and the drugs used in treating HIV are no exception. Changing treatment because of side-effects is quite common. ...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side effects

    The most common side effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug. After a few weeks, these side effects usually...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Lipodystrophy

    Lipodystrophy (lip-oh-diss-troh-fee) is the name for changes in body shape first reported in 1997 among people taking HIV treatment. It was originally thought that the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Information on the side-effects associated with anti-HIV treatments and other drugs, including advice on how to cope with them, and whether treatment should be stopped...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Effect of genetic variation on side-effects of HIV drugs

    In addition to drug levels, the other major area of research interest in pharmacogenetics is the association of human genetic variation with the incidence or...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Your shape

    This booklet covers the side effects of fat loss, fat gain, raised blood fats and raised blood sugars....

    From: 'Your' booklets series

    Information level Level 1
  • Your treatment

    This booklet gives a basic, but comprehensive introduction to HIV treatment....

    From: 'Your' booklets series

    Information level Level 1

Side-effects features

Side-effects in your own words

Side-effects news from aidsmap

More news

Side-effects news selected from other sources

  • US guidelines shift to integrase-based combinations for first-line treatment: Atripla relegated due to side effects

    The rationale for dropping Atripla is due to concerns about the tolerability of efavirenz, especially the high rate of central nervous system related toxicities. Although this has been a long-standing community concern, DHHS guidelines have consistently recommended efavirenz in previous editions. This tolerability statement is made in the year that efavirenz comes off patent.

    06 May 2015 | i-Base
  • Predictors of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy in the modern era

    Researchers at major clinical centres in the U.S. have collaborated to study potential causes of peripheral neuropathy (PN) among HIV-positive people in the modern era. They recruited about 500 people who were free from PN and monitored them for an average of two years, performing extensive assessments. Taking into account many issues, statistical analysis found that there were several factors associated with an increased risk for PN.

    01 April 2015 | CATIE
  • HIV Organizations Urge Continuation of D:A:D Study

    D:A:D follows 50,000 HIV-positive people, looking at drug safety and side effects over time. Results from D:A:D have changed HIV treatment guidelines, and how HIV-positive people are treated by their health care providers. We urge pharmaceutical companies to continue funding this vital study.

    11 February 2015 | Treatment Action Group
  • Antiretroviral Neurotoxicity May Cause Cognitive Problems

    As many as 50% of those on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suffer from mild to moderate cognitive dysfunction. Antiretroviral medications themselves may be partly to blame for such neurocognitive problems, suggests a recent review of previous studies. But the authors of this review do not recommend that antiretroviral treatment be stopped.

    28 January 2015 | The Body Pro
  • HIV—Pregnancy-related issues

    Themed issue of CATIE's magazine Treatment Update, with several articles on the safety of antiretrovirals during pregnancy.

    20 January 2015 | CATIE
  • Zimbabwe finally switches away from stavudine

    The Zimbabwean government has finally dropped stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine as its first-line HIV therapy in favour of a single dose treatment which has a combination of three drugs, namely tenofovir/lamivudine/efavirenz (TLN).The Government dropped the first line HIV treatment after realizing that it was causing severe side effects on patients. Stanley Takaona of the Zimbabwe HIV and AIDS Activist Union Community Trust said the introduction of the new HIV drug was going to save more lives.

    19 January 2015 | AllAfrica
  • Dramatic decline in risk for heart attacks among HIV-positive Kaiser Permanente members

    Previously reported increased risk of heart attacks among HIV-positive individuals has been largely reversed in recent years for Kaiser Permanente's California patients, according to a study published in the current online issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. The adjusted risk ratio for heart attacks among HIV-positive study participants went from an 80 percent increased risk in 1996 to no increased risk in 2010-2011. Reported first on Aidsmap at http://www.aidsmap.com/Heart-attack-risk-in-people-with-HIV-may-be-falling-but-not-in-women/page/2834402/ .

    19 January 2015 | Eurekalert
  • Viral Load Reductions Persist With Less Efavirenz for HIV

    The virologic responses with reduced-dose efavirenz at 48 weeks have proven durable out to 96 weeks, ENCORE1 study results show.

    07 November 2014 | Medscape (requires free registration)
  • IDWeek 2014: AbbVie 3D HCV Regimen Well-tolerated in PEARL Trials

    AbbVie's 3D hepatitis C regimen containing paritaprevir (ABT-450), ombitasvir, and dasabuvir was generally well-tolerated in the Phase 3 PEARL trials, according to a pooled analysis presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. Serious side effects were uncommon and few people discontinued treatment for this reason.

    16 October 2014 | HIVandHepatitis.com
  • IDWeek 2014: Efavirenz Not Linked to Suicide in Analysis of Insurance Records

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the Atripla single-tablet regimen) was not associated with a higher rate of suicidal thoughts or attempts in an analysis conducted by manufacturer Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS), researchers reported at the 2014 IDWeek meeting last week in Philadelphia.

    16 October 2014 | HIVandHepatitis.com
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