Women: latest news

Women resources

  • Bacterial vaginosis

    Women may get bacterial vaginosis when the balance of normal bacteria in their vagina becomes disrupted.It is common and various activities seem to increase the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Contraception

    Your choice of contraception will depend on your situation and preferences.There are possible interactions between some hormonal contraceptives and some anti-HIV drugs. Your HIV treatment needs to be...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bone problems and HIV

    When your bones are thinner, a trip or fall can result in a broken bone. Exercise and other lifestyle changes are good for your bones. People aged 50+ and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Menopause and HIV

    The menopause is a natural part of each woman’s ageing process. Knowing what symptoms to expect during the menopause can help you deal with the experience. Hormone replacement therapy...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health monitoring during pregnancy

    If a woman has HIV, it is possible for it to be passed on to her baby during pregnancy or delivery, or through breastfeeding. For this reason,...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and having a baby

    Women living with HIV can give birth without passing on HIV to the baby.Your options for conception will depend on your health and your partner’s...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Having a baby

    Lots of people with HIV have had babies without passing on the infection. To do so, you need some help from your doctor.If you are...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • HIV & women

    The booklet is for women living with HIV. It includes information on wellbeing, HIV treatment, sexual health, contraception and pregnancy....

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment, pregnancy and contraception

    When HIV treatment is used during pregnancy, it protects your health as well as playing an important role in preventing HIV being passed on from you to...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV & Pregnancy

    Personalised information about having a baby. (Smartphone version available.)...

    From: Resources

  • HIV & Contraception

    ...

    From: Resources

  • Pregnancy

    Since 1999 it has been routine for pregnant women in the UK to be offered an HIV test. The test was introduced in recognition of...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4
  • Mother-to-child transmission

    HIV can pass from an HIV-positive mother to her child:During pregnancy – the foetus is infected by HIV crossing the placenta.During childbirth – the...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4
  • Women's health issues

    Globally, HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women aged 15 to 49 years. A majority of women acquire HIV as a result of unprotected...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Women features

Women in your own words

Women news from aidsmap

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Women news selected from other sources

  • What having HIV taught me about sex, love and myself

    Dating is different now but I'm confident I won't pass the virus on

    02 August 2018 | BBC News
  • AIDS 2018: The Story is Messy

    It's already clear that the story from Amsterdam is that ending epidemic levels of new HIV diagnoses depends on building services and societies that recognize individuals as wonderful, wild, weird, whole people, with more specificity, respect and rigor than ever before. It also depends on activism, nasty women and their male allies, everyone demanding change, refusing to play nice.

    26 July 2018 | AVAC
  • UNAids chief refuses to quit over handling of sexual misconduct claims

    The head of UNAids, who has been under pressure to resign over his handling of sexual harassment allegations within the agency, has told the Guardian he will not quit, saying that the HIV epidemic is at a crisis point and there is more work to do.

    18 July 2018 | The Guardian
  • To End the HIV Epidemic, Focus on Sexual Violence Prevention

    Adolescent girls and young women are up to eight times more likely to have HIV than their male counterparts. We know that sexual coercion, abuse and violence are major drivers of these infections. In fact, girls who experience sexual violence are up to three times more likely to be infected with HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases than those who do not.

    18 July 2018 | Council on Foreign Relations (blog)
  • Accountability, Sexual Harassment Concerns In Spotlight At UNAIDS Board Meeting

    Accountability and prevention and response to harassment, including sexual harassment, bullying and abuse of power, are high on the minds of delegates attending a three-day meeting of the ruling body of UNAIDS this week in Geneva.

    09 July 2018 | Health Policy Watch
  • The fall-out of war: women are twice as likely to be living with HIV in post-conflict Uganda

    Women who survived the war in Northern Uganda are almost twice as likely to be living with HIV compared to their male peers, and are also disproportionately impacted by trauma and depression, reveals new research.

    04 July 2018 | AVERT
  • HPV test is better than Pap smear at detecting precancerous cervical changes, study says

    A test for HPV detects precancerous changes of the cervix earlier and more accurately than the Pap smear, according to a large clinical trial published Tuesday.

    03 July 2018 | Washington Post
  • Why are drug-related deaths among women increasing in Scotland?

    Drug-related deaths have increased significantly in Scotland in recent years. Although men still account for the majority of cases, over the last 10 years the percentage increase in deaths among women has been much greater than among men. This report draws on routine data, published research, conversations with professional stakeholders, and interviews with women with lived experience of problem drug use to examine potential explanations for this phenomenon, and to identify priority areas for future work.

    02 July 2018 | Scottish Government
  • British colonial law linked to higher HIV rates among women in sub-Saharan Africa

    The likelihood that a woman in sub-Saharan Africa has HIV today is linked to whether her country was once colonized by Britain or a continental European country, according to a June 2018 study published in American Economic Review.

    27 June 2018 | Journalist's Resource
  • Survey reveals women experience severe reproductive health issues

    A new Public Health England (PHE) survey reveals that 31% of women experience severe reproductive health problems, but under half seek help.

    27 June 2018 | GOV.UK
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.