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  • How to use condoms and lubricant

    Using condoms correctly will prevent them breaking, leaking or slipping off during sex.Use only water-based or silicone lubricants, not oil-based. If you lose your erection...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Female condoms for anal sex

    Female condoms are also known as internal condoms, and can be used for both vaginal and anal sex. As they provide a physical barrier, they are likely to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)

    PEP involves taking a 28-day course of anti-HIV drugs, after possible exposure to HIV.Doctors will assess your risk of HIV infection before prescribing PEP.PEP is available from...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • What are the side-effects of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)?

    In the UK the recommended first-line PEP medications of emtricitabine/tenofovir and raltegravir are generally well tolerated by most people.Nonetheless, some people do have short-term problems with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Better off knowing

    The sooner you know you have HIV, the sooner you can get the medical care you need. If you know you have HIV, you can...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • How hepatitis C is passed on

    When the blood of a person who has hepatitis C enters the bloodstream of another person, that person could get hepatitis C.Tiny and unseen traces...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • GPs and primary care

    Many GPs offer services which are not available at your HIV clinic.To access a GP you must be registered as their patient.You don't have to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Condoms

    Condoms protect against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy.Both female and male condoms are available.It’s important to follow the advice on how to use...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Preparing for the future

    As you get older, your circumstances and your needs are likely to change. While it’s hard to know exactly how life will be in a few years’...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hepatitis C and HIV

    Hepatitis C is a blood-borne infection that is transmitted in some of the same ways as HIV.Over time untreated hepatitis C...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Home delivery of anti-HIV drugs

    NAM's factsheet on home delivery of HIV treatment; who's eligible and how it works...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Telling healthcare workers you are living with HIV

    To ensure they can give you the right care and treatment, it can be important to tell health professionals that you are living with HIV.There...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Adherence tips

    You may find that a pill box, a phone alarm or a diary helps you with adherence.Adherence can be more challenging when travelling or when...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma and HIV

    Kaposi’s sarcoma remains one of the most common cancers in people living with HIV.HIV treatment protects against Kaposi’s sarcoma and slows down disease progression.People with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cognitive impairment and HIV

    Problems with thinking and memory can have a wide range of causes.A healthy lifestyle lowers the risk of cognitive impairment in later life.Cognitive impairment caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Emergency contraception and unwanted pregnancy

    For women taking HIV treatment, the intrauterine device (IUD) is the recommended method of emergency contraception.Women taking some anti-HIV drugs need to take a double dose of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Contraception

    Your choice of contraception will depend on your situation and preferences.There are possible interactions between some hormonal contraceptives and some anti-HIV drugs. Your HIV treatment needs to be...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health monitoring during pregnancy

    If a woman has HIV, it is possible for it to be passed on to her baby during pregnancy or delivery, or through breastfeeding. For this reason,...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Type 2 diabetes and HIV

    Changes to your lifestyle can reduce your risk of diabetes.Diabetes requires frequent monitoring and can have serious consequences if left untreated. Rates of diabetes are higher in people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their energy levels after starting HIV treatment.A healthy balanced diet may help...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Drug resistance

    It's important to always take your HIV treatment at the right times and in the right amounts. If you don't, HIV may become drug resistant.When...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Testing

    HIV testing in the UK is free, voluntary and confidential. You can be tested at an NHS sexual health clinic, a GP surgery or a...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • How hepatitis C is passed on during sex

    Hepatitis C can be passed on during sex that could lead to contact with semen, rectal mucus or blood.Many gay men with HIV have picked...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Sleep

    Sleep is essential to physical and mental health.Anxiety, depression, drug or alcohol use, and illness can contribute to sleep problems.Simple lifestyle changes may be enough to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Vitamins, minerals and herbal supplements

    A balanced diet will provide all the vitamins and minerals most people need.Large doses of vitamin and mineral supplements can be harmful.Several herbal remedies can interact dangerously...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Travelling with HIV medications – time zone changes

    Travelling to a new time zone may affect when it’s best to take your medication.If you have an undetectable viral load, taking one dose a few hours...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Exercise

    Exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle.Exercise has many physical benefits and can also improve mental health.It is recommended that adults do moderate...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV testing

    HIV tests are available in lots of healthcare settings. Home HIV testing is also available.Laboratory tests are the most accurate but rapid tests can be...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • PrEP

    This briefing paper provides an overview of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people planning, commissioning or providing HIV prevention activities in the UK. It does this by reviewing...

    From: HIV prevention briefing papers

  • Home HIV testing

    Self-sampling and self-testing are new options for taking an HIV test.You don't need to see a doctor or nurse to use home testing kits.HIV tests...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV testing technologies

    This briefing paper, produced by NAM for HIV Prevention England, provides an overview of HIV diagnostic tests for people planning, commissioning or providing HIV prevention...

    From: HIV prevention briefing papers

  • Sex and HIV

    Sex, desire and pleasure need not stop when you have an HIV diagnosis. Women continue to be sexually active and to have fulfilling sexual and emotional relationships. Many...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health issues

    If you are ‘HIV positive’ this means that you have a virus called HIV in your body. It doesn’t mean that you are ill, or that...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment as prevention

    This briefing paper, produced by NAM for HIV Prevention England, describes the scientific evidence for HIV treatment as prevention and considers its implications for the UK....

    From: HIV prevention briefing papers

  • Access to health care

    Information on the provision of NHS health care to non-UK citizens....

    From: Social & legal issues for people with HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Behaviour change

    A practical introduction to the evidence regarding the effectiveness of non-biomedical HIV prevention methods....

    From: Preventing HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Post-exposure prophylaxis

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) has been in use, in healthcare settings, since 1988. Providing PEP after sexual exposure is more controversial....

    From: Preventing HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis is an experimental HIV-prevention strategy that would use antiretrovirals (ARVs) to protect HIV-negative people from HIV infection....

    From: Preventing HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Microbicides

    Microbicides are any substances which protect people against infection by microbes, such as viruses or bacteria, on contact with those microbes....

    From: Preventing HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Lipodystrophy

    This section begins with an overview of metabolic and body-fat changes, including sections on Metabolism - the basics, HIV, HAART and metabolic changes and Treating...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Services for people with HIV

    An overview of how health and social services are provided in the UK....

    From: Social & legal issues for people with HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Risk

    An examination of prosecuted behaviours, using scientific evidence to determine actual risk, and how this evidence has been applied in jurisdictions worldwide....

    From: HIV & the criminal law

    Information level Level 4

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  • New UN guidelines to mainstream human rights in the global drugs debate

    In early March, the Chief Executives Board of the United Nations, representing 31 UN agencies – including the World Health Organisation, UNICEF, the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime – adopted a common position on drug policy. Among the actions agreed is was a commitment to “support the development and implementation of policies that put people, health and human rights at the centre … and to promote a rebalancing of drug policies and interventions towards public health approaches”.

    13 hours ago | The Conversation
  • US Immigration Groups Want Data On HIV Asylum Seekers

    It's been nearly a decade since the United States began allowing people with HIV from abroad to enter the country as immigrants. But the U.S. has never provided data on the number of HIV-positive refugees or asylum seekers admitted since the immigration law changed in 2010, despite efforts from groups including the Center for American Progress and Immigration Equality.

    18 March 2019 | Gothamist
  • Talking to Children About Terminal Illness

    New guidelines call for speaking openly with children when they or their parents face life-threatening diseases.

    18 March 2019 | New York Times
  • How South Africa can improve community-based HIV services

    South Africa introduced a community-based primary health care programme in 2012. The aim of the programme, which includes a large HIV component, is to improve access to health care. Under the programme, community health workers provide a wide range of services such as health education and referrals to clinics for HIV testing and treatment. Community health workers also support people on antiretroviral therapy and trace those who default on treatment. We did a study that examined the factors impacting on the success of the community-based HIV programme in a district in Limpopo, one of South Africa’s rural provinces.

    18 March 2019 | The Conversation
  • A Farewell to Project Inform from HIV Research Advocate David Evans

    The HIV community was dealt a sad blow this week when it was announced that the iconic non-profit HIV treatment advocacy organization, Project Inform, will end its programs. Project Inform’s Director of Research Advocacy, David Evans, has been working with the organization in various capacities for the last 27 years. In this message shared with My Fabulous Disease, David reflects on Project Inform’s legacy and on the influence of its legendary founder, Martin Delaney. We must all honor this legacy by ensuring that HIV treatment advocacy remain at the forefront of our movement.

    18 March 2019 | My Fabulous Disease
  • Curing HIV just got more complicated. Can CRISPR help?

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drugs have turned HIV infection from a death sentence to a chronic condition. In most people the drugs routinely tamp HIV levels so low that standard tests find no virus in blood samples. But inexplicably, in about 10% of infected people HIV remains easily detectable in the blood even though they take their daily pills and are not saddled with drug-resistant mutants of the virus.

    18 March 2019 | Science
  • UK Government appoints first National Adviser for LGBT Health

    Clinical adviser in the NHS appointed to advise on LGBT health issues. Expert panel also appointed, which will focus on key issues such as conversion therapy, improving access and tackling inequality in healthcare.

    18 March 2019 | gov.uk
  • LGBT+ health adviser urges Britain to make HIV-prevention drug free

    Britain’s first national adviser for LGBT+ health has said the roll-out of a highly effective HIV prevention pill could save hundreds of thousands of pounds for the country’s publicly funded health authority. In an exclusive interview Michael Brady, who will take up the role on April 1, said a planned roll-out of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) - a once-daily pill that protects against HIV – in England would prove cost effective “very quickly”.

    18 March 2019 | Reuters
  • CROI 2019: Interventions raise men’s HIV testing rates

    A financial incentive as small as a $3 voucher for food dramatically increases HIV testing in areas with high HIV infection rates but low rates of testing, researchers said here. In places where HIV testing and linkage to care among men remain low while new infections among women and deaths from HIV among men remain high, scaling up the use of such small incentives may be an effective tool in increasing the number of people who know their HIV status, Hae-Young Kim of the Africa Health Research Institute said.

    14 March 2019 | Science Speaks
  • Jean-Michel Molina, MD, on Biomedical Failures of PrEP: Rare, But Serious

    "There are multiple reasons for PrEP failures and they could be at any point in the PrEP continuum of care. From people who may not use their pills as recommended, to a health care system that is not able to provide access to PrEP for people in need, it could be also the physicians who are not ready to prescribe PrEP or not aware that they could use PrEP for preventing HIV in high-risk patients. It could be also the test that we use sometimes that are not able to detect acute HIV infection. And, if you start PrEP in someone with acute HIV infection you will see more resistance."

    14 March 2019 | Contagion Live
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.