A viral load test shows how much HIV there is in a small sample of blood. The lower the amount the better. The aim of HIV treatment is to reduce viral load to a level which is too low to be measured by standard tests. This is called an ‘undetectable’ viral load. This means HIV is still present in your body, but at a low level.

Viral load: latest news

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Viral load news selected from other sources

  • Detectable HIV Despite Treatment? Clonal Expansion Could Be The Culprit

    In a study of people with a low but detectable viral load despite adherence to treatment, infected cells were apparently cloning themselves.

    14 March 2019 | Poz
  • Viral load monitoring motivates HIV treatment adherence in eSwatini

    The treat-all policy will only succeed if people keep taking their HIV treatment. It is important to motivate people who started treatment while they were still feeling well. 

    24 February 2019 | AVERT
  • Uganda: Financial incentives do not boost HIV viral suppression rate

    Financial incentives had no effect on viral suppression among HIV-positive adults in Uganda, according to a recent study. Researchers said these findings suggest a need for better interventions to promote the achievement of viral suppression.

    25 January 2019 | Healio
  • How do we define “undetectable” in HIV prevention?

    In real life, whether your viral load is 50, 100, or 200 copies may not matter as much as how long your virus has been suppressed.

    23 January 2019 | BETA blog
  • Single measures of viral load not effective for assessing HIV suppression status

    The percentage of HIV-positive individuals with durable viral suppression may be overestimated when calculated by single measures of viral load, according to findings published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

    08 August 2017 | Healio
  • HIV viral load testing capacities progress, require global support, multiple partners to reach 90-90-90 goals

    Four of seven sub-Saharan African countries followed by researchers over the last year and a half now can track the effectiveness of HIV treatment among all patients receiving it with tests to measure the levels of virus in their bodies at least once a year, according to an update in last week’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

    06 December 2016 | Science Speaks
  • HIV effort let down by test shortages, says WHO

    A shortage of HIV testing could undermine global efforts to diagnose and treat people with the infection, warn experts from the World Health Organization.

    24 August 2016 | BBC Health
  • HIV and drug resistance

    A recent study found more resistance to the antiretroviral medicine tenofovir than had previously been reported, with 20% resistance to tenofovir in patients with treatment failure in Europe and over 50% resistance in patients with treatment failure in sub-Saharan Africa... The study underlines the importance of rapidly identifying treatment failure through routine measurement of viral load suppression—this is the basis of the third pillar of UNAIDS’ 90–90–90 treatment target, that 90% of people accessing HIV treatment have suppressed viral loads.

    09 February 2016 | UNAIDS
  • Malawi: Govt Launches HIV Viral Load Scale Up Strategic Implementation Plan

    Government on Wednesday launched the Viral Load scale Up Strategic Implementation Plan for the years 2015 to 2018.

    19 January 2016 | AllAfrica
  • Undetectable & Low-level HIV Viral Replication

    Even people who are adherent to their medication regimens may experience occasional “blips” in their viral loads, experience viral rebound or maintain a steady, if low, viral load above undetectable levels. To understand why some people struggle to achieve or remain undetectable, we spoke with Keith Henry, MD, an HIV specialist at Hennepin County Medical Center who has more than 25 years of experience caring for people with HIV.

    06 January 2016 | BETA blog
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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