The search for an HIV prevention vaccine: latest news

The search for an HIV prevention vaccine resources

  • Vaccines

    HIV vaccine researchers are still looking for a vaccine that would offer a significant degree of protection against HIV infection....

    From: Preventing HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • Vaccines

    The promise of an effective HIV vaccine has always been just over the horizon, but more than 20 years after the identification of HIV, vaccines...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4

The search for an HIV prevention vaccine features

The search for an HIV prevention vaccine news from aidsmap

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The search for an HIV prevention vaccine news selected from other sources

  • Roadmap reveals shortcut to recreate key HIV antibody for vaccines

    A team led by Duke Human Vaccine Institute researchers, publishing online Dec. 11 in the journal Immunity, reported that they have filled in a portion of the roadmap toward effective neutralization of HIV, identifying the steps that a critical HIV antibody takes to develop and maintain its ability to neutralize the virus.

    3 hours ago | Eurekalert Inf Dis
  • Needles in a haystack: the quest for bnAbs

    HIV induces antibody responses in infected individuals, but only a few of these individuals manage to produce antibodies that are capable of viral neutralization—and even fewer produce antibodies that can neutralize different strains of HIV.

    01 December 2018 | Nature
  • Scientists unveil promising new HIV vaccine strategy

    A new candidate HIV vaccine from Scripps Research surmounts technical hurdles that stymied previous vaccine efforts, and stimulates a powerful anti-HIV antibody response in animal tests. The new vaccine strategy, described in a paper on November 23 in Science Advances, is based on the HIV envelope protein, Env. This complex, shape-shifting molecule has been notoriously difficult to produce in vaccines in a way that induces useful immunity to HIV. However, the Scripps Research scientists found a simple, elegant method for stabilizing Env proteins in the desired shape even for diverse strains of HIV. Mounted on virus-like particles to mimic a whole virus, the stabilized Env proteins elicited robust anti-HIV antibody responses in mice and rabbits. Candidate vaccines based on this strategy are now being tested in monkeys.

    27 November 2018 | Scripps Research Institute
  • Why Don’t We Have Vaccines Against Everything?

    Money is just the obvious obstacle. A few diseases, like H.I.V., so far have outwitted both the immune system and scientists.

    22 November 2018 | New York Times
  • Continued declines in HIV research funding put global prevention targets at great risk

    HIV prevention research funding continued to decline in 2017 for the fifth consecutive year, driven largely by a five-year low in US public sector funding, according to a report released today at the HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P 2018) conference in Madrid, Spain.

    26 October 2018 | HIV Prevention R&D Working Group
  • J&J touts latest immune response data for 'mosaic' HIV vaccine program

    Johnson & Johnson has already advanced a “mosaic” HIV vaccine candidate into efficacy testing in five southern African countries, but this week the company unveiled initial results from an early-stage study comparing tetravalent and trivalent candidates in its program.

    24 October 2018 | Fierce Pharma
  • New Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise Strategic Plan lays out a roadmap to speed the development of a safe and effective vaccine against HIV

    The Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise, hosted by the International AIDS Society (IAS), has launched a five-year strategy to accelerate the development of an effective vaccine to prevent HIV infection. The new Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise Strategic Plan (2018-2023) was unveiled today at the opening of HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P 2018), the world’s only scientific conference dedicated exclusively to biomedical HIV prevention, in Madrid, Spain.

    23 October 2018 | International AIDS Society
  • Why do some people produce HIV-fighting antibodies? Duke researchers may have an answer

    Duke researchers have recently discovered why some people can produce antibodies capable of fighting HIV, and the answer might lie in one special protein.

    18 October 2018 | Duke Chronicle
  • How Natural Killer cells regulate protective HIV antibodies

    The finding advances efforts to develop a vaccine that elicits protective HIV antibodies.

    01 October 2018 | Science Daily
  • Special antibodies could lead to HIV vaccine

    Around one percent of people infected with HIV produce antibodies that block most strains of the virus. These broadly acting antibodies provide the key to developing an effective vaccine against HIV. Researchers have now shown that the genome of the HI virus is a decisive factor in determining which antibodies are formed.

    11 September 2018 | Science Daily
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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