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  • US: Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

    What's New in the Guidelines? Revisions to the April 8, 2015, version of the guidelines are largely based on findings from two large, randomized controlled trials that addressed the optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART)—START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy) and TEMPRANO.

    01 February 2016 | AIDS.info
  • HIV/AIDS Guidelines App available for iOS and Android Devices

    AIDSinfo is releasing a new HIV/AIDS Guidelines app for mobile devices. The AIDSinfo Guidelines app provides mobile access to the federally approved HIV/AIDS medical practice treatment guidelines. The guidelines include recommendations approved by expert panels on the treatment of HIV infection and related opportunistic infections in adults, adolescents, and children and on the management of perinatal HIV infection.

    24 January 2016 | U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
  • NICE publishes new guideline to better tackle tuberculosis

    NICE – the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence of England – published guidance on how to better treat and prevent tuberculosis. England has more TB cases than any other country in Western Europe.

    15 January 2016 | NICE press release
  • Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: what’s new

    The 2015 guidelines includes 10 new recommendations to improve the quality and efficiency of services to people living with HIV. Implementation of the recommendations in these guidelines on universal eligibility for ART will mean that more people will start ART earlier.

    01 December 2015 | World Health Organization
  • Barriers to progress – Treatment activists’ response to WHO HIV treatment guidelines 2015

    Three issues that represent barriers to continued progress: community-led treatment education is inadequately supported and needs to be scaled up; people living in middle income countries are denied affordable access to essential medicines, such as dolutegravir; availability of routine viral load monitoring remains patchy.and limited in too many countries.

    01 December 2015 | International Treatment Preparedness Coalition
  • Accelerate expansion of antiretroviral therapy to all people living with HIV: WHO

    On World AIDS Day WHO emphasizes that expanding antiretroviral therapy to all people living with HIV is key to ending the AIDS epidemic within a generation.

    01 December 2015 | World Health Organization
  • Genvoya added to US recommended first-line options for HIV treatment

    Based on efficacy and safety data from phase 3 randomized clinical trials, EVG/c/FTC/TAF will be added as one of the Recommended Initial Regimens for ART-naive adults and adolescents with estimated creatinine clearance ≥ 30 mL/min (AI).

    23 November 2015 | AIDSinfo
  • Leading liver doctors: Hepatitis C patients must be treated

    Many insurers – both private and public – are delaying access to new HCV treatments to patients until their disease has progressed and the liver is further damaged. There is no medical evidence to justify that position and much to justify treating all patients.

    17 November 2015 | American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases press release
  • Sobering Results from Real World HIV Treatment Analysis

    The proportion of people with HIV whose treatment is successful appears lower in the real world than in clinical trials, a researcher said here.

    12 October 2015 | MedPage Today
  • British HIV Association (BHIVA) 2015 Treatment Guidelines published

    The new BHIVA treatment guidelines recommend: "All individuals with HIV... are reviewed promptly by an HIV specialist and offered immediate ART." See http://www.aidsmap.com/page/2979458/ for a summary of the main recommendations.

    26 September 2015 | BHIVA
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