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  • Genvoya added to US recommended first-line options for HIV treatment

    Based on efficacy and safety data from phase 3 randomized clinical trials, EVG/c/FTC/TAF will be added as one of the Recommended Initial Regimens for ART-naive adults and adolescents with estimated creatinine clearance ≥ 30 mL/min (AI).

    23 November 2015 | AIDSinfo
  • Leading liver doctors: Hepatitis C patients must be treated

    Many insurers – both private and public – are delaying access to new HCV treatments to patients until their disease has progressed and the liver is further damaged. There is no medical evidence to justify that position and much to justify treating all patients.

    17 November 2015 | American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases press release
  • Sobering Results from Real World HIV Treatment Analysis

    The proportion of people with HIV whose treatment is successful appears lower in the real world than in clinical trials, a researcher said here.

    12 October 2015 | MedPage Today
  • British HIV Association (BHIVA) 2015 Treatment Guidelines published

    The new BHIVA treatment guidelines recommend: "All individuals with HIV... are reviewed promptly by an HIV specialist and offered immediate ART." See for a summary of the main recommendations.

    26 September 2015 | BHIVA
  • Australia: Treatment Now Recommended for all people with HIV

    Based on the results from two large trials, the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine (ASHM) Sub-Committee for Guidance on HIV Management in Australia strongly recommends that all people with HIV, regardless of their viral load or CD4 count, consider starting HIV treatment.

    18 September 2015 | Australasian Society for HIV Medicine
  • The Day the HIV Treatment Pendulum Stopped Swinging

    Normally at scientific conferences, even when study findings are considered to be major, a single researcher stands at a podium for 10 or 15 minutes, takes the audience on a guided PowerPoint tour of charts and graphs, receives a round of applause, and fields a few questions. Then the session moves on to its next topic. The presentation of the START findings was different.

    23 July 2015 | The Body Pro
  • People with HIV live almost 20 years longer than in 2001

    People living with the HIV virus today can expect to live nearly two decades longer than those who were diagnosed at the start of this century, thanks to cheaper and more readily available antiretroviral drugs, the UN said in a major report on a disease once seen by many as a death sentence to be endured in secrecy. The average HIV-positive person is now expected to live for 55 years – 19 years longer than in 2001, according to the report by the UN’s Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAids).

    14 July 2015 | The Guardian
  • NHS England announces annual investment decisions for certain specialised services [including HIV treatment as prevention]

    NHS England has today (2 July) set out its planned investment decisions for certain specialised services as part of its annual commissioning round.

    03 July 2015 | NHS England press release
  • START Making Sense

    The story of the START trial will continue to be told for a long time to come. For some it will be a tale of rigorous perseverance in the face of strong counter-prevailing headwinds and ultimate arrival at a result that is solid and conclusive. Others will see a single-minded and aggressive defense of a trial by investigators who refused to accept not only the obvious but also the evidence that rendered their design obsolete and even unethical.

    19 June 2015 | North Carolina AIDS Training and Education Center
  • When to START has never been clearer

    Posirtive Lite editor Bob Leahy in conversation with CATIE’s Sean Hosein about START, the important and ground-breaking study that recently provided definitive evidence of the health benefits of starting HIV treatment sooner rather than later.

    10 June 2015 | Positive Lite
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