Tests are used to diagnose HIV (to show whether someone has HIV or not) and other tests, including CD4 count and viral load, are used to assess the health of someone who is HIV-positive.

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Testing and health monitoring: latest news

Testing and health monitoring resources

Testing and health monitoring features

Testing and health monitoring in your own words

  • Finding out

    The day was 9th of November, 2009; I was having my college lesson on the concepts of computer script languages – what a day it...

    From: In your own words

  • The bus of doom

    I've recently read the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman (which, if you haven't already read, I highly recommend). In this theological novel disguised...

    From: In your own words

  • Seroconversion

    I was given my diagnosis over the telephone after spending four days in hospital with meningitis. I now realise it wasn’t meningitis, it was an...

    From: In your own words

Testing and health monitoring news from aidsmap

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Testing and health monitoring news selected from other sources

  • Terrence Higgins Trust: Why we’re embracing digital innovation

    One of Terrence Higgins Trust’s strategic priorities is to end HIV transmission. A key part of this is to get more people, and particularly those most at risk, testing regularly for HIV. That means we need to look at new ways to reach people, deliver testing and normalise the whole experience.

    15 February 2017 | Charity Comms
  • Bridging gaps in hepatitis C awareness and diagnosis

    If ever there was an area of healthcare where place-based care could have a major impact on local public health gains it is the identification and treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients. However the same reasons that point to place-based health systems being of value for this condition also make it one of the most difficult challenges to take on. If place-based care can be made to work for treating HCV it can be made to work across the system.

    10 February 2017 | New Local Government Network
  • DIY test for HIV comes to a pharmacy near you

    For R59.95 South Africans can now purchase an HIV testing kit from a local pharmacy and screen themselves for infection in the privacy of their homes – effectively by-passing the health system altogether.

    17 January 2017 | Health-e
  • Health Matters: Your questions on increasing the uptake of HIV testing

    Questions from health professionals and answers from Public Health England.

    04 January 2017 | Public Health England
  • Going beyond current ideas about the cascade of HIV care

    Scientists in France have recently noted that while the cascade of HIV care as it is currently envisaged is useful, it does not provide a complete picture of what is occurring in the continuum of care. There are significant delays moving from one step of the cascade to the next - more attention needs to be placed on the time people spend between each stage of the continuum of care.

    03 January 2017 | CATIE
  • Every missed HIV diagnosis is a failure of care

    Response from Professor Chloe Orkin, chair of the British HIV Association (BHIVA), to an article discouraging GPs from offering HIV testing.

    24 December 2016 | Pulse
  • Why male couples should think about HIV in their relationships

    Recent research by my team showed that gay men in relationships perceive themselves to be at less risk of HIV and test less frequently for HIV than single men, despite frequent non-use of condoms with their main partners.

    05 December 2016 | The Conversation
  • If at First an HIV Viral Load Blips, Test, Test (the Same Sample) Again

    If an HIV-positive patient's viral load test results come back between 50 copies/mL and 200 copies/mL, consider retesting the same blood sample, Joseph Eron Jr., M.D., suggests. According to study results he presented at IDWeek 2016 on Oct. 28, the new test result may well show a viral load below 50 copies m/L, potentially altering the choices a clinician makes of how to approach that patient's care.

    09 November 2016 | The Body Pro
  • Cochrane says: Chlamydia screening may have very limited impact, but more research is needed

    There is a strong rationale for systematic Chlamydia screening, and it is widely recommended and practised. Yet there are harms associated with the screening process, and, of course, serious concerns about its cost-effectiveness. This lends urgency to the question of whether Chlamydia screening works – addressed in a recently published systematic review for the Cochrane Database.

    04 October 2016 | BMJ Group blogs
  • The CDC’s Gay Dance Video about HIV is Flat Out Fabulous

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has produced a music video that joyfully educates gay men about HIV prevention options. And it is foot-stomping fabulous. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_espkK-vLgc

    27 September 2016 | My Fabulous Disease
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
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  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.