Side-effects: latest news

Side-effects resources

  • Lipodystrophy

    Lipodystrophy (lip-oh-diss-troh-fee) is the name for changes in body shape and metabolism first reported in 1997 among people taking HIV treatment. It’s not completely clear what causes lipodystrophy, but...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • My drugs chart

    My drugs chart provides information on all the anti-HIV drugs currently licensed for use in Europe.Select your chosen drugs and drag them onto the area...

    From: My drugs chart

  • Antiretroviral drugs chart

    A one-page reference guide to the anti-HIV drugs licensed for use in the European Union, with information on formulation, dosing, key side-effects and food restrictions....

    From: Antiretroviral drugs chart

    Information level Level 1
  • HIV treatment in women

    The evidence available suggests that HIV treatment works well for women. Unless you are pregnant, the recommendations for HIV treatment are the same for both women and...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Like all medications, anti-HIV drugs can cause side-effects and these can be a reason why people don’t take their treatment properly. The risk of side-effects can vary between...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Like all medication, anti-HIV drugs can have side-effects. Read more here on what these are and how to deal with them if you experience side-effects....

    From: Living with HIV

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    The booklet provides information about possible side-effects of HIV treatment. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    We take medicines to make us better or to keep us well, but all medicines can cause unwanted secondary effects. These are usually called side-effects,...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Neuropathy - nerve pain

    Neuropathy is damage to the nerves. Nerves transmit signals within the brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system or CNS), and extend from the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Facial wasting

    New cases of facial wasting caused by anti-HIV drugs are now rare in the UK.Fat loss from the face is one of the components of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hyperbilirubinaemia

    Bilirubin is a waste product produced by the liver during the breakdown of old red blood cells. The technical term for abnormally high levels of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lactic acidosis

    Lactic acidosis is a serious side-effect of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) class of anti-HIV drugs. This class includes AZT (zidovudine, Retrovir), 3TC (lamivudine, Epivir), d4T...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Skin problems

    There are three main causes of skin problems in people with HIV: interactions between the immune system and HIV, infections, and side-effects of drugs. Some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pain

    Every day most of us will experience physical pain of some sort. For the most part it will cause only minor discomfort and won’t interfere...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Nausea and vomiting

    Nausea is a word for the feeling of wanting to vomit or be sick. Most people with HIV will experience nausea and vomiting at some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea is common among people with HIV. It can be a side-effect of anti-HIV drugs as well as some other medicines, such as antibiotics. Diarrhoea...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Tiredness and fatigue are common problems among people with HIV. There are many possible causes and treatments and there are also things you can do...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Changing treatment due to side-effects

    All drugs can cause side-effects and the drugs used in treating HIV are no exception. Changing treatment because of side-effects is quite common. ...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side effects

    The most common side effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug. After a few weeks, these side effects usually...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Effect of genetic variation on side-effects of HIV drugs

    In addition to drug levels, the other major area of research interest in pharmacogenetics is the association of human genetic variation with the incidence or...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Side-effects

    Information on the side-effects associated with anti-HIV treatments and other drugs, including advice on how to cope with them, and whether treatment should be stopped...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Side-effects features

Side-effects in your own words

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Side-effects news selected from other sources

  • Gilead announces results from first study to evaluate switching to FTAF-based regimens from Truvada® (FTDF)-based regimens

    Investigational F/TAF-based regimens demonstrate high rates of virologic suppression and improved renal and bone laboratory parameters compared to Truvada-based regimens.

    24 February 2016 | Gilead press release
  • Viread (Tenofovir, TDF) Linked With Liver Disease and Cancer

    Long-term use of Viread (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, or TDF) is associated with an increased risk of end-stage liver disease (ESLD) as well as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the most common form of liver cancer) among people with HIV.

    14 January 2016 | Poz
  • Short- or Medium-Term PrEP Is Safer Than Aspirin

    Truvada as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV has comparable safety to aspirin, at least for the short- and medium-term.

    13 January 2016 | AIDSMeds
  • South African Medicines Agency approves PrEP

    The South African Medicines Control Council (MCC) has approved PrEP. So far it has issued a brief statement, saying that on 28 November it "Approved the use of the fixed-dose combination of tenofovir disoproxyl fumarate and emtricitabine to include pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV(also referred to as PrEP)." The MCC names the separate drugs rather than Truvada, as South Africans take generic versions of the drugs made on licence locally. The MCC does not recommend criteria for PrEP access or name specific populations but instead soliticts applications from organisations that wish to provide PrEP. Its one stipulation is that, since using the drugs for prevention is a new field, records of adverse events in people offered PrEP should be kept by providers.

    08 December 2015 | South African MCC
  • Body fat changes and lactic acidosis with HIV medicines: EMA recommends removal of class warnings for several medicines

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has updated the advice on the risk of body fat changes and lactic acidosis with medicines for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As a result, HIV medicines will no longer require a warning concerning fat redistribution in their product information, and a number of medicines of the class ‘nucleoside and nucleotide analogues’ will no longer require a warning about lactic acidosis.

    26 October 2015 | European Medicines Agency
  • TAF and TDF Compared for Kidney, Bone Toxicity in Black HIV+ Patients

    Including tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) in single-tablet elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine (E/C/F/TAF) is associated with reduced renal and bone toxicity compared to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing single-tablet (E/C/F/TDF) therapy, according to an analysis of data from two Phase 3 trials, reported at IDWeek 2015.

    12 October 2015 | Monthly Prescribing Reference
  • Doctors Find Effective HIV Drug Course Free of Efavirenz

    Once considered part of the gold standard of HIV treatment, alternative regimens can now alleviate concerns about birth defects, psychiatric problems, and even suicide caused by the drug efavirenz. Research published this week shows that three alternative, first-line HIV treatments that do not include efavirenz are just as good at suppressing the virus and are better tolerated.

    08 October 2015 | Healthline
  • Tenofovir Alafenamide Combo Pill Matches Truvada for HIV Efficacy, but Easier on Bones and Kidneys

    A fixed-dose combination pill containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) worked as well in a Phase 3 trial as the current Truvada pill containing the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) -- which is used for both HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP -- but causes less kidney and bone toxicity, according to an announcement this week from Gilead Sciences.

    04 September 2015 | HIVandHepatitis.com
  • US guidelines shift to integrase-based combinations for first-line treatment: Atripla relegated due to side effects

    The rationale for dropping Atripla is due to concerns about the tolerability of efavirenz, especially the high rate of central nervous system related toxicities. Although this has been a long-standing community concern, DHHS guidelines have consistently recommended efavirenz in previous editions. This tolerability statement is made in the year that efavirenz comes off patent.

    06 May 2015 | i-Base
  • Predictors of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy in the modern era

    Researchers at major clinical centres in the U.S. have collaborated to study potential causes of peripheral neuropathy (PN) among HIV-positive people in the modern era. They recruited about 500 people who were free from PN and monitored them for an average of two years, performing extensive assessments. Taking into account many issues, statistical analysis found that there were several factors associated with an increased risk for PN.

    01 April 2015 | CATIE
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