Side-effects: latest news

Side-effects resources

  • Antiretroviral drug chart

    A one-page reference guide to the anti-HIV drugs licensed for use in the European Union, with information on formulation, dosing, key side-effects and food restrictions....

    From: Antiretroviral drug chart

    Information level Level 1
  • What are the side-effects of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)?

    In the UK the recommended first-line PEP medications of emtricitabine/tenofovir and raltegravir are generally well tolerated by most people.Nonetheless, some people do have short-term problems with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Talking to your doctor

    Taking antiretroviral therapy is a long-term commitment. At present, once you start the drugs, you are likely to be on them for the rest of your life. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Many side-effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug.Other medicines can be taken to help control side-effects.Possible side-effects should be taken...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Skin problems

    A rash can be a symptom of recent HIV infection. Other infections can also cause skin problems. They may also be a side-effect or allergic reaction to an anti-HIV drug. Allergic drug...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Multiple medications and drug interactions

    The more drugs you take, the greater the risk of drug interactions and side-effects. It’s important to tell your doctors and pharmacists about all the other medicines you take. An...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lactic acidosis

    Lactic acidosis refers to a build-up of lactic acid in the blood.It is a rare but dangerous side-effect of some anti-HIV drugs – most of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pain

    Pain can cause emotional and mental health problems.Medication can be used in both the short and long term to control pain.Treating underlying medical problems may...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Neuropathy – nerve pain

    Peripheral neuropathy means damage to the nerves in the feet or hands.Symptoms can range from tingling to numbness to excruciating pain.There are many possible causes, including anti-HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hyperbilirubinaemia

    High levels of bilirubin in the body can be a side-effect of the anti-HIV drug atazanavir.It can make the skin or eyes more yellow, but...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    The booklet provides information about possible side-effects of HIV treatment. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Nausea and vomiting

    Nausea and vomiting are possible side-effects of some HIV drugs.Most often, these side-effects will go away after a few weeks of taking the drug.Medicines called...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Changing HIV treatment

    Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about any side-effects you are experiencing.If you are having problems taking your HIV treatment, it’s important to be honest...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea is common in people with HIV, particularly those with a low CD4 count.It can be caused by infection and is also a possible side-effect of some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects checker

    A tool to help you talk to your healthcare team about any side-effects or symptoms that you have....

    From: Resources

  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their energy levels after starting HIV treatment.A healthy balanced diet may help...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side effects

    The most common side effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug. After a few weeks, these side effects usually...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Managing side-effects that interfere with eating

    Like all medicines, the drugs used to treat HIV can cause side-effects. These are most likely to occur when you first start taking a drug, but...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sleep

    Sleep is essential to physical and mental health.Anxiety, depression, drug or alcohol use, and illness can contribute to sleep problems.Simple lifestyle changes may be enough to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lipodystrophy

    Lipodystrophy is a side-effect of some older anti-HIV drugs which are now rarely used.Lipodystrophy includes both weight gain and weight loss.It is common for people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Talking points: a checklist for you and your doctor

    Talking points is designed to help you talk to your doctor about HIV treatment....

    From: Resources

  • My drugs chart

    My drugs chart provides information on all the anti-HIV drugs currently licensed for use in Europe.Select your chosen drugs and drag them onto the area...

    From: My drugs chart

  • HIV treatment side-effects and mental health

    Some anti-HIV drugs can affect your emotional and mental health. Most notably, the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the combination pill, Atripla) has...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment in women

    The evidence available suggests that HIV treatment works well for women. Unless you are pregnant, the recommendations for HIV treatment are the same for both women and...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Like all medications, anti-HIV drugs can cause side-effects and these can be a reason why people don’t take their treatment properly. The risk of side-effects can vary between...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Effect of genetic variation on side-effects of HIV drugs

    In addition to drug levels, the other major area of research interest in pharmacogenetics is the association of human genetic variation with the incidence or...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Side-effects

    Information on the side-effects associated with anti-HIV treatments and other drugs, including advice on how to cope with them, and whether treatment should be stopped...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Side-effects features

Side-effects in your own words

Side-effects news from aidsmap

More news

Side-effects news selected from other sources

  • A Promising Anti-HIV Drug Poses A Dilemma

    The anti-HIV drug dolutegravir is effective — but may carry a risk for pregnant women. While women in wealthy countries are given choices about their medical care, for women in poor countries the situation is different. There aren't enough doctors and nurses to explain the risks and benefits of the new drug to every patient. The country may not have the resources to keep supplies of two different drugs on the shelves. And there is no consistent access to effective birth control.

    23 April 2019 | NPR
  • Weight gain with new antiretrovirals: It's complicated

    South Africa’s next big shift in our antiretroviral programme is to replace efavirenz with a newish drug called dolutegravir. The Department of Health is pleased at the prospect of a safer, more robust and, amazingly, cheaper drug. But last year, the first reports surfaced that people using it were gaining weight.

    15 April 2019 | Spotlight
  • Gilead Lawsuits: 41 HIV and PrEP Patients File California Personal Injury Case Over Gilead's TDF-Based Drugs

    41 patients from 12 states nationwide who are living with HIV or AIDS or were on PrEP filed a personal injury lawsuit against Gilead Sciences Inc. seeking to hold the Bay Area drug maker accountable for actions around its failure to rectify a known defect in the drug formulation of one of its most widely prescribed medications: tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) knowing that a safer alternate, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) existed in its own laboratory; its failure to warn patients of the damaging side effects of TDF; and the company’s active misrepresentation of TDF’s efficacy and substantial risks.

    12 April 2019 | Associated Press
  • HIV Drugs With Fewer Side Effects Need More FDA Support

    New medicines providing a better quality of life should always be top priority when asking for federal support.

    27 March 2019 | HivPlusMag.com
  • Inactive Ingredients in Medications Cause Trouble for Some

    Most approved medications have inactive ingredients that could cause problems for individuals with allergies or intolerances to those ingredients, researchers say. Those problems can add up when patients take more than one medication with troublesome ingredients.

    14 March 2019 | Medscape (requires free registration)
  • Large French study examines neuropsychiatric side effects with integrase inhibitors

    The largest prospective study to date on integrase inhibitors and their potential for being associated with neuropsychiatric side effects was conducted in France. With more than 21,000 HIV-positive participants, the study found that the proportion of people who stopped taking integrase inhibitors due to neuropsychiatric side effects was generally very low (between 1% and 3%). Of particular note is the fact that before starting treatment with an integrase-inhibitor-containing regimen, between 3% and 10% of participants had previously reported neuropsychiatric side effects with other classes of HIV treatment.

    12 March 2019 | CATIE
  • Efavirenz and psychological performance in children living with HIV

    Efavirenz remains a clinically effective and relevant antiretroviral drug for people living with HIV – but adverse side effects need to be screened for and monitored in children.

    15 February 2019 | AVERT
  • Tenofovir Alafenamide Linked to Fanconi Syndrome

    This case study is presented as a caution to clinicians that tenofovir alafenamide can cause Franconi Syndrome.

    12 February 2019 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • South Africa urgently needs an antiretroviral pregnancy registry

    With the dolutegravir roll-out around the corner, the time is now ripe for patients and activists to demand a prospective pregnancy registry for the whole of South Africa. Whether it is a new endeavour or piggy-backs on international efforts is a matter for debate, but it is the only way we can answer the question of dolutegravir’s safety with the minimum number of women being exposed to the drug. It’s the least that patients deserve.

    29 January 2019 | Spotlight
  • Six advantages of dolutegravir

    Dolutegravir is a critically important antiretroviral medicine that is set to become the backbone of South Africa and many other countries’ HIV programmes. While the drug has recently made headlines because of a potential safety risk, most of what we know about the medicine indicates that it represents an important improvement over existing medicines.

    28 January 2019 | Spotlight SA
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.