Side-effects: latest news

Side-effects resources

  • Talking to your doctor

    Taking antiretroviral therapy is a long-term commitment. At present, once you start the drugs, you are likely to be on them for the rest of your life. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Antiretroviral drugs chart

    A one-page reference guide to the anti-HIV drugs licensed for use in the European Union, with information on formulation, dosing, key side-effects and food restrictions....

    From: Antiretroviral drugs chart

    Information level Level 1
  • Side-effects

    Many side-effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug.Other medicines can be taken to help control side-effects.Possible side-effects should be taken...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Skin problems

    A rash can be a symptom of recent HIV infection. Other infections can also cause skin problems. They may also be a side-effect or allergic reaction to an anti-HIV drug. Allergic drug...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Multiple medications and drug interactions

    The more drugs you take, the greater the risk of drug interactions and side-effects. It’s important to tell your doctors and pharmacists about all the other medicines you take. An...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lactic acidosis

    Lactic acidosis refers to a build-up of lactic acid in the blood.It is a rare but dangerous side-effect of some anti-HIV drugs – most of...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pain

    Pain can cause emotional and mental health problems.Medication can be used in both the short and long term to control pain.Treating underlying medical problems may...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Neuropathy - nerve pain

    Peripheral neuropathy means damage to the nerves in the feet or hands.Symptoms can range from tingling to numbness to excruciating pain.There are many possible causes, including anti-HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Hyperbilirubinaemia

    High levels of bilirubin in the body can be a side-effect of the anti-HIV drug atazanavir.It can make the skin or eyes more yellow, but...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    The booklet provides information about possible side-effects of HIV treatment. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Nausea and vomiting

    Nausea and vomiting are possible side-effects of some HIV drugs.Most often, these side-effects will go away after a few weeks of taking the drug.Medicines called...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Changing HIV treatment

    Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about any side-effects you are experiencing.If you are having problems taking your HIV treatment, it’s important to be honest...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea is common in people with HIV, particularly those with a low CD4 count.It can be caused by infection and is also a possible side-effect of some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects checker

    A tool to help you talk to your healthcare team about any side-effects or symptoms that you have....

    From: Resources

  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their energy levels after starting HIV treatment.A healthy balanced diet may help...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side effects

    The most common side effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug. After a few weeks, these side effects usually...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Managing side-effects that interfere with eating

    Like all medicines, the drugs used to treat HIV can cause side-effects. These are most likely to occur when you first start taking a drug, but...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sleep

    Sleep is essential to physical and mental health.Anxiety, depression, drug or alcohol use, and illness can contribute to sleep problems.Simple lifestyle changes may be enough to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lipodystrophy

    Lipodystrophy is a side-effect of some older anti-HIV drugs which are now rarely used.Lipodystrophy includes both weight gain and weight loss.It is common for people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Talking points: a checklist for you and your doctor

    Talking points is designed to help you talk to your doctor about HIV treatment....

    From: Resources

  • My drugs chart

    My drugs chart provides information on all the anti-HIV drugs currently licensed for use in Europe.Select your chosen drugs and drag them onto the area...

    From: My drugs chart

  • HIV treatment side-effects and mental health

    Some anti-HIV drugs can affect your emotional and mental health. Most notably, the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the combination pill, Atripla) has...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment in women

    The evidence available suggests that HIV treatment works well for women. Unless you are pregnant, the recommendations for HIV treatment are the same for both women and...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side-effects

    Like all medications, anti-HIV drugs can cause side-effects and these can be a reason why people don’t take their treatment properly. The risk of side-effects can vary between...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Effect of genetic variation on side-effects of HIV drugs

    In addition to drug levels, the other major area of research interest in pharmacogenetics is the association of human genetic variation with the incidence or...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Side-effects

    Information on the side-effects associated with anti-HIV treatments and other drugs, including advice on how to cope with them, and whether treatment should be stopped...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Side-effects features

Side-effects in your own words

Side-effects news from aidsmap

More news

Side-effects news selected from other sources

  • What triggered my heart attack?

    Jackie Morton, ex-Chair of the European AIDS Treatment Group, found her severe pain was due to a heart attack. Here she writes a detailed, dispassionate and scientific blog on the possible causes - and remedies.

    19 November 2018 | EATG
  • Cardiovascular Risk Unclear for HIV Patients on Dolutegravir

    Patients with HIV who switched to a dolutegravir-based regimen from a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor regimen experienced body mass gain and changes in biomarkers related to increased insulin resistance, according to a subanalysis of the NEAT 022 study.

    01 November 2018 | Medscape (requires free registration)
  • Dolutegravir Use During Pregnancy: What Are the Risks?

    Infectious Disease Advisor spoke to Rebecca M. Zash, MD, a co-investigator of the interim analysis by the Tsepamo Study in Botswana, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in July.

    22 October 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Efavirenz in HIV-positive pregnant women, risk of neurological condition in children

    Researchers found children of women whose ART regimen included efavirenz were 60 percent more likely to develop a neurological condition, such as microcephaly (small head), seizures (from a high fever or other cause) and eye abnormalities than children whose mothers took other ART medications.

    05 October 2018 | IDSA press release
  • Why the world may force women to choose: No birth control, no ARVs

    A new drug could save 25 000 women living with HIV but could it come at the cost of their babies lives?

    22 August 2018 | Bhekisisa
  • Dolutegravir preconception signal: time is up for shoddy surveillance

    The news in May 2018 of a potential risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking dolutegravir (DTG) at the time of conception sent shockwaves through the HIV community. But, despite massive global investment, aggressive transition plans – as well as calls for years for more systematic recording of outcomes when women receive ART in pregnancy– few prospective birth registrieshave been established in other settings that can refute or confirm this finding. Meanwhile, women of child-bearing age, whether they intend to become pregnant or not, are being told that they must stick with (or go back to) efavirenz (EFV) – a drug that, before this news, was in the process of being replaced with DTG.

    16 July 2018 | HIV i-Base
  • We Must Talk About Having Diarrhea. I’ll Go First.

    My discomfort discussing anything butt-related is well documented, but this is important. Here’s why. One in five people living with HIV suffers from chronic diarrhea. That’s too many, and I happen to be one of them. Many of us figure that if the meds are working and we’re healthy, then gastrointestinal problems simply come with the territory. Remember the HIV drug Kaletra? What a nightmare.

    16 July 2018 | My Fabulous Disease
  • Dolutegravir: need to consider all pros and cons before switching in pregnancy

    A young pregnant woman who switched from dolutegravir (DTG)-based ART, in response to the neural tube defect safety signal, experienced viral rebound on her new regimen. She needed to be switched back to DTG to achieve re-suppression and prevent vertical transmission.

    11 July 2018 | HIV i-Base
  • No association found between efavirenz, suicide risk

    Contrary to previous findings, individuals with HIV treated with efavirenz demonstrated no increased risk for suicidal ideation or depression, according to new research published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

    26 June 2018 | Healio
  • What is on the minds of PLHIV in Europe in terms of their long term health?

    If they were to switch to different HIV medications, long term health and a low risk of long term side effects are by far the two most important aspects in the eyes of respondents living with HIV in Europe.

    25 June 2018 | EATG
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.