Sexually transmitted infections: latest news

Sexually transmitted infections resources

  • Candidiasis (thrush)

    Candidiasis (thrush) is a common yeast infection, treated with anti-fungal drugs.Mild candidiasis in the mouth is relatively common in people with HIV.Good oral hygiene can reduce the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sexual health screening

    If you’re sexually active it is important to have regular tests for sexually transmitted infections. These tests are available free of charge from specialist sexual health or...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health checks

    Staff at your HIV clinic use various tests to keep an eye on your health. Many of these tests are done on samples of your...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • How hepatitis C is passed on during sex

    Hepatitis C can be passed on during sex that could lead to contact with semen, rectal mucus or blood.Many gay men with HIV have picked...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Sexual health check-ups

    Looking after your sexual health is important for anyone, but particularly so if you are living with HIV. If you are sexually active, it is important to have...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Syphilis

    Syphilis is a common sexually transmitted infection that is usually easy to treat.Syphilis can progress more quickly and severely in people living with HIV.It can be contracted during...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sexually transmitted infections

    This section contains a brief explanation of how common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are passed on, their symptoms and their treatment. STIs can be caused by bacteria, viruses...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Part II: HIV and preventing sexual transmission

    Part 2 explains why good physical sexual health is important for people living with HIV, and outlines the steps you can take to protect your own health...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • NGU and NSU – non-gonococcal and non-specific urethritis

    NGU and NSU can be caused by several STIs.NGU/NSU is diagnosed by a swab test or checking a urine sample.NGU and NSU are treated with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pubic lice and scabies

    Pubic lice and scabies are easily treated.Your GP or staff at a sexual health clinic can diagnose pubic lice or scabies.Pubic lice and scabies are...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • LGV (lymphogranuloma venereum)

    LGV is a form of chlamydia and tests for chlamydia also detect LGV.Most LGV cases are in HIV-positive gay men. LGV is treated with a...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Chlamydia

    Chlamydia can be transmitted via infected semen or vaginal fluids.Using a condom during sex is an effective way of preventing  chlamydia.Chlamydia is easily treated with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Gonorrhoea

    Gonorrhoea can be passed on during anal, vaginal and oral sexCondoms can prevent infection with gonorrhoea.Gonorrhoea is treated with a single dose combination of antibiotics....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) and genital warts

    HPV can be passed on during unprotected anal, vaginal or oral sex. Vaccines against HPV are available.  Some strains of HPV can cause genital warts....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Herpes

    Herpes is transmitted by contact with skin where the herpes simplex virus is present.Antiviral treatments can reduce the discomfort of an outbreak of herpes.Being infected...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Shigellosis

    Shigella is transmitted by contact with very small amounts of human faeces. Shigellosis can be successfully treated with antibiotics.Using condoms for anal sex and latex...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bacterial vaginosis

    Bacterial vaginosis may occur when the balance of bacteria in the vagina becomes disrupted. Symptoms include changes to vaginal discharge and a fishy smell.Having bacterial vaginosis increases the risk...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Treating sexually transmitted infections to prevent HIV

    One strand of investigation in the biomedical prevention of HIV is to see whether we can reduce HIV incidence by treating other sexually transmitted infections...

    From: Preventing HIV

    Information level Level 4

Sexually transmitted infections features

Sexually transmitted infections in your own words

Sexually transmitted infections news from aidsmap

More news

Sexually transmitted infections news selected from other sources

More news

Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.