Rate of infection from HIV-infected transfusions

A systematic review of the risk of infection following transfusion of contaminated blood found that estimates ranged from 88 to 100% (pooled estimate 92%).1

Nonetheless, not all recipients of HIV-infected blood seroconvert. A 1989 study of 220 recipients of blood from HIV-positive donors found that 85 were HIV-negative. Those who seroconverted were more likely to have received large quantities of blood and/or to have received blood from a donor who subsequently developed AIDS less than two and a half years after giving blood.

Those who progressed to AIDS within seven years of the transfusion were more likely to have received large quantities of blood when transfused, and to have been more severely ill (measured by length of stay in hospital). After seven years, 49% of the recipients of infected blood were estimated to have progressed to AIDS. Those who had received blood from donors who developed AIDS within two and a half years of giving blood were more likely to have developed AIDS within four years than those who did not.2

References

  1. Baggaley RF Risk of HIV-1 transmission for parenteral exposure and blood transfusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AIDS 20(6): 805-812, 2006
  2. Ward JW The natural history of transfusion-associated infection with human immunodeficiency virus: factors influencing the rate of progression to disease. NEJM 321(14): 947-952, 1989
This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.