Knowing you have HIV means you can take steps to look after your health. The sooner you know, the less risk there is that you will become ill because of HIV. People often do not realise they have been at risk of HIV until they are already unwell.

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  • More than 1 in 8 Americans with HIV unaware

    Roughly 87 percent of people in the United States who have HIV have been diagnosed, close to the goal of 90 percent by 2015 set by President Barack Obama as part of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy in 2010.

    26 June 2015 | UPI.com
  • Just Five States Have HIV Diagnosis Rates Over 90 Percent

    The CDC has released estimates of the rate of people living with HIV who are aware of their serostatus, broken down by state.

    26 June 2015 | AIDSMeds
  • Toward Comprehensive HIV Prevention Service Delivery in the United States: An Action Plan

    This action plan, based primarily on the proceedings of the two consultations, seeks to define a communityfocused national strategy for integrating historically separate HIV prevention interventions and services— many with established positive effects on individual health outcomes—into needs-driven components of population-based care and support programs.

    25 June 2015 | Treatment Action Group
  • HIV testing to become routine in innovative Coventry GP pilot

    HIV testing in Coventry (UK) is to become a routine part of registering with a GP at ten surgeries across the city, which has the highest prevalence of the condition in the West Midlands.

    17 June 2015 | Medical Xpress
  • Center offers free pride tickets for HIV test

    The Antiviral Research Center at UC San Diego is continuing its popular “Testing for Tickets” program this year, offering 250 free passes to the two-day LGBT Pride Music Festival for people who undergo HIV testing at one of five local clinics.

    16 June 2015 | U-T San Diego
  • Australia: Men not testing regularly enough for HIV

    The number of men who have sex with men testing for HIV may be rising, but those who should be testing more often are not doing so.

    06 May 2015 | Gay News Network
  • Screening for HIV in GP surgeries leads to increased and earlier diagnosis

    Training general practices to offer rapid HIV tests leads to increased detection and earlier diagnosis of patients with HIV infection – according to a new study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and published in The Lancet HIV.

    29 April 2015 | Queen Mary press release
  • Self-testing for HIV in low-income, high-incidence countries could save money, could improve outcomes . . . but it’s complicated, analysis finds

    Introducing self-testing in a country like Zimbabwe, where HIV incidence is high, resources to confront HIV are limited, and only about half the people who live with HIV know they have the virus, could save about $75 million over the next 20 years, with some health benefits, besides. That would make the self-testing more cost-effective than the current situation.

    10 April 2015 | Science Speaks
  • An alternative service design for sexual health

    We’ve just launched SH:24, a new 24/7 sexual health service that offers free self-testing and rapid results by text message to people in Lambeth and Southwark. Our boroughs have some of the highest rates of acute STIs nationwide and large populations of risk groups, including young people and black and minority communities.

    07 April 2015 | Guy’s and St Thomas’ Charity
  • New York City Gets Its HIV Act Together

    High proportions of New York City residents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are being diagnosed, receiving care, and seeing their serum viral load plummet to undetectable levels, city health officials reported here.

    02 March 2015 | MedPage Today HIV/AIDS
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.