Information about the use of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy and other aspects of care for HIV-positive women during pregnancy, so as to prevent vertical transmission and ensure the best outcomes for both mother and infant.

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission: latest news

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  • What you need to know about SA's historic liver transplant from an HIV-positive donor

    How could a baby get an organ from a person living with HIV and not automatically contract the virus? The experts weigh in.

    09 October 2018 | Bhekisisa
  • HIV stigma blocks efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmission in India

    Outreach workers identify a number of personal, social, and structural challenges that impede efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in India.

    05 October 2018 | AVERT
  • AIDS 2018: The Story is Messy

    It's already clear that the story from Amsterdam is that ending epidemic levels of new HIV diagnoses depends on building services and societies that recognize individuals as wonderful, wild, weird, whole people, with more specificity, respect and rigor than ever before. It also depends on activism, nasty women and their male allies, everyone demanding change, refusing to play nice.

    26 July 2018 | AVAC
  • Darunavir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1

    New pharmacokinetic data show mean exposure of darunavir (brand name Prezista) boosted with cobicistat (available in combination in Rezolsta, Symtuza) to be lower during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy than during 6–12 weeks postpartum. Low darunavir exposure may be associated with an increased risk of treatment failure and an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission to the unborn child.

    18 July 2018 | MHRA
  • Dolutegravir preconception signal: time is up for shoddy surveillance

    The news in May 2018 of a potential risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking dolutegravir (DTG) at the time of conception sent shockwaves through the HIV community. But, despite massive global investment, aggressive transition plans – as well as calls for years for more systematic recording of outcomes when women receive ART in pregnancy– few prospective birth registrieshave been established in other settings that can refute or confirm this finding. Meanwhile, women of child-bearing age, whether they intend to become pregnant or not, are being told that they must stick with (or go back to) efavirenz (EFV) – a drug that, before this news, was in the process of being replaced with DTG.

    16 July 2018 | HIV i-Base
  • Dolutegravir: need to consider all pros and cons before switching in pregnancy

    A young pregnant woman who switched from dolutegravir (DTG)-based ART, in response to the neural tube defect safety signal, experienced viral rebound on her new regimen. She needed to be switched back to DTG to achieve re-suppression and prevent vertical transmission.

    11 July 2018 | HIV i-Base
  • New contraindication against using darunavir/cobicistat during pregnancy

    On 22 June 2018, Janssen issued a Dear Doctor letter (linked below) against using darunavir/cobicistat during pregnancy. This new contraindication is based on significantly reduced plasma levels of darunavir and cobicistat during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Darunavir can still be used during pregnancy, but only when boosted by ritonavir.

    25 June 2018 | HIV i-Base
  • Yes, HIV-Positive Men Can Become Fathers. Here's Two Providers Who Help Them

    In HIV, we pay a lot of attention to parenthood -- but mostly from the perspective of ending mother-to-child transmission. Even then, the public health message is often mostly about the baby, not the health and well-being of the mother. But almost nowhere do we have deep discussions about reproductive options for HIV-positive men, particularly cisgender straight men.

    18 June 2018 | TheBody.com
  • Nigeria has more HIV-infected babies than anywhere in the world. It’s a distinction no country wants

    At a time when rates of mother-to-child transmission of HIV have plummeted, even in far poorer countries, Nigeria accounted for 37,000 of the world’s 160,000 new cases of babies born with HIV in 2016.

    13 June 2018 | Science
  • The End of AIDS: Far from Over

    The tools exist. HIV/AIDS can be treated and contained. But in many communities, social, political and economic obstacles get in the way. There, the epidemic is far from over. PBS Newshour reports from Russian, Nigeria and Florida.

    12 June 2018 | PBS NewsHour
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.