Pharmaceutical industry: latest news

Pharmaceutical industry features

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Pharmaceutical industry news selected from other sources

  • Gilead Continues To Block Ireland From Sourcing Generic Truvada

    Gilead Sciences, the company that supplies Ireland with the drug Truvada, will have a full court hearing in mid-October to determine whether the Irish Health and Safety Executive (HSE) can source a generic analogue of the drug from the pharmaceutical giant’s competitors. In July, GCN reported that Gilead was taking legal action to stop the HSE from securing generic drug from Actavis and Mylan, the company’s competitors, for the purposes of HIV prevention as PrEP.

    16 October 2017 | Gay Community News
  • CE Marking for world’s only integrated HIV Self-Test from Atomo Diagnostics

    Atomo HIV Self Test granted CE Mark; will facilitate rollout in European and other global markets. Test will be available commercially during 2018 via retail, e-commerce and public health channels.

    13 October 2017 | Atomo press release
  • Brand Name Vs Generic Drugs: The Fight Continues

    Many patients and practitioners are looking to generics to ease the pressure of skyrocketing antiretroviral (ART) drug prices, but according to Rochelle P Walensky, MD, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, they shouldn’t hold their breath.

    10 October 2017 | MD Mag
  • UK pharma denied legal challenge to drugs bill cap

    From 1 April this year, NHS England has had the power to launch price negotiations if a NICE-approved drug is expected to cost more than £20 million in any of its first three years on the market. The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) has been refused a legal challenge to the cap.

    05 October 2017 | Pharmaphorum
  • Hepatitis C Drug’s Lower Cost Paves Way For Medicaid, Prisons To Expand Treatment

    Valerie Green is still waiting to be cured. The Delaware resident was diagnosed with hepatitis C more than two years ago, but she doesn’t qualify yet for the Medicaid program’s criteria for treatment with a new class of highly effective but pricey drugs. The recent approval of a less expensive drug that generally cures hepatitis C in just eight weeks may make it easier for more insurers and correctional facilities to expand treatment.

    05 October 2017 | Kaiser Health News
  • The Hepatitis Drug Market Is Worse Than Wall Street Realises

    Slowing hepatitis C drug sales have taken a bite out of Gilead's share price.This is a smart retreat for Merck and J&J. The HCV market is well past its peak. Both of their new therapies would have been very late; AbbVie and Gilead both had new drugs approved this year. Their best hope likely would have been to compete on price in a market that's been warring over price for a while.

    04 October 2017 | Bloomberg
  • The Medicines Patent Pool and Gilead Sciences Sign Licence for Bictegravir

    The Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) today announced a licence with Gilead Sciences for bictegravir (BIC), now under review in the United States and the European Union as part of a once-daily, single-tablet HIV regimen. The licence allows manufacturers to develop and sell generic medicines containing BIC, if approved in the United States, in 116 low- and middle-income countries where more than 30 million people live with HIV.

    04 October 2017 | Medicines Patent Pool
  • Promising HIV Treatments in Late-Stage Clinical Development

    The following monotherapies and combination regimens are in late-stage clinical development or FDA review.

    02 October 2017 | P&T Community
  • Is HCV Drug Development Nearing Its End?

    The FDA recently approved two new combination regimens for hepatitis C, raising the question of whether further drug development is warranted in this area. Experts agree, however, that more remains to be done in terms of implementation: getting everyone at risk screened for HCV infection, and getting those who test positive on effective treatment.

    02 October 2017 | MedPage Today
  • Unitaid Official Explains How ‘Breakthrough’ HIV Medicine Pricing Deal Brings Best To The Neediest

    Health officials from the UN and foundations announced what they called a breakthrough pricing agreement that will speed the availability of “the first affordable, generic, single-pill HIV treatment regimen containing [the key compound] dolutegravir to public sector purchasers in low- and middle-income countries at around $75 per person, per year.” A senior official at Unitaid, the drug purchasing mechanism that helped reach the deal, explained to Intellectual Property Watch how it came about and why this is significant.

    26 September 2017 | Intellectual Property Watch
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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