News and information about HIV in injecting drug users. The criminalisation of drug use and the marginalisation of drug users contribute to vulnerability to HIV.

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  • New research finds heating drug use equipment linked to decreased HIV risk

    Researchers found HIV was transmitted more through drug cookers than needles. Heating drug use equipment was found to reduce the risk of infection

    15 May 2019 | CATIE
  • Cash Incentives, Peer Support May Not Incentivize HCV Treatment

    A randomized trial comparing a cash incentive to peer support for increasing acceptance of treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) among persons with HCV/HIV coinfection, including those who use drugs or alcohol, found both methods helpful but that 1 in 4 patients still declined treatment.

    10 May 2019 | MD Magazine
  • Cocaine injecting and homelessness linked to Glasgow HIV outbreak

    Rising HIV infections among people who inject drugs in Glasgow reveals changes in injecting behaviours, with cocaine injecting becoming more common – a practice with greater HIV risks

    07 May 2019 | AVERT
  • 329 NGOs call on world leaders to address the global health and human rights crisis among people who use drugs on the occasion of the 26th International Harm Reduction Conference

    As civil society and global experts gather in Porto for the 26thInternational Harm Reduction Conference, 329 NGOs are calling on the international community to address the ongoing global health and human rights crisis among people who use drugs. The latest numbers on the HIV epidemic, just released by UNAIDS, are alarming. While global HIV incidence declined by 25% between 2010 and 2017, it is rising among people who inject drugs. Outside of Sub-Saharan Africa, people who inject drugs and their sexual partners continue to account for roughly one quarter of all people contracting HIV. Globally, six in ten people who use drugs are living with hepatitis C, while 168,000 people who use drugs were reported to have died of an overdose in 2015 alone.

    01 May 2019 | International Drug Policy Consortium
  • Seattle HIV cluster found in drug users, those without homes

    The opioid epidemic and a rising population of people experiencing homelessness have helped fuel an HIV outbreak in North Seattle.

    23 April 2019 | San Francisco Chronicle
  • Cocaine injecting and homelessness 'behind Glasgow HIV rise'

    A rise in cocaine injecting and homelessness are behind a 10-fold increase in HIV infection among drug users in Glasgow, research suggests.

    10 April 2019 | BBC News
  • HIV Incidence and Risk Behaviours of People Who Inject Drugs in Bangkok, 1995–2012

    HIV incidence in people who inject drugs in Bangkok declined from 5.7 per 100 person-years during the cohort study, to 2.7 per 100 person-years in the vaccine trial, to 0.7 per 100 person-years among PrEP study placebo recipients. Incidence peaked at 12.1 per 100 person-years in 1996 and declined to <1.0% during 2005–2012. Several factors likely contributed to the decline, including decreases in the frequency of injecting and sharing, improved access to HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy, and the use of PrEP. Expanding access to effective HIV prevention tools can hasten control of the HIV epidemic among PWID.

    01 April 2019 | The Lancet
  • Promises to improve health outcomes for people who inject drugs remain unfulfilled as 99% do not have adequate access to HIV and harm reduction services

    New report by UNAIDS highlights the urgent need to implement a human rights and evidence-informed approach to reach people who inject drugs with essential health services.

    13 March 2019 | UNAIDS
  • Dramatic rise in U.S. opioid deaths as epidemic spreads to eastern states

    Long believed to be concentrated among Appalachian states and parts of the Midwest, Alexander's research shows that the crisis has spread. Eastern states have seen a sharp rise in opioid deaths – with Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, New Hampshire and Ohio among the states with the highest rise in opioid-related deaths.

    13 March 2019 | Medical Xpress
  • Women Have High Syphilis Rates, Too

    For women in the general population, the incidence of syphilis is at a 20-year high. But for women with HIV — particularly those who inject drugs — the incidence is 330% higher than that, data from a long-term study show. The biggest indicators of syphilis in women are hepatitis C infection and injection drug use. This means that providers should tailor syphilis screening to women with indicators of injection drug use, particularly in regions of the country hardest hit by injection drug epidemics.

    11 March 2019 | Medscape (requires free registration)
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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