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  • England: Drug fatalities highest where treatment cutbacks deepest

    More heroin and crack users are dying of overdoses in the areas of England where cuts to drug treatment budgets have been among the greatest, analysis by the Observer shows.

    16 October 2017 | The Guardian
  • EJAF announces bold new funding initiatives to combat HIV epidemics in Eastern Europe/Central Asia and in the U.S.

    The Elton John AIDS Foundation today announced new funding initiatives to increase advocacy and service delivery for people living with and at-risk for HIV and hepatitis C. In Eastern Europe, we will launch the Key Populations Fund for Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA KP Fund), focused on prevention and treatment of HIV for individuals most vulnerable to the HIV epidemic in the region: people who use drugs, sex workers, and gay and bisexual men in the region.

    10 October 2017 | EJAF
  • Duterte’s ‘drug war’ is fueling the spread of disease

    Front-line advocates in this city in the central Philippines say the violent anti-drug campaign is pushing users ever further underground, fueling the spread of disease by stopping efforts to get them clean needles.

    10 October 2017 | Washington Post
  • Reconsidering Primary Prevention: a Call To Action For The Global HIV Response

    "The [HIV] prevention toolbox is getting bigger, but the application of the tools is getting smaller. For...prevention to stand a chance, the silence, denial, negativity, and moralism surrounding sex and drug use must end. Policy makers and donors, including governments, must shed their reluctance to openly and positively address sex and drug use in their public health discourse and responses to HIV."

    09 October 2017 | MSMGF
  • Chemsex Has Always Been With Us

    Not before time, the gay press in London, realising we have a dangerous drugs-and-sex scene here that is killing gay men, has finally started to cover it in an analytic, compassionate and sober way (pun intended). I’m pleased about this, and pleased by this powerfully written piece by David Stuart (see https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/chemsex-will-defines-period-gay-history/#gs.3r47mag). No one has done more to help and rescue gay Londoners who have got lost in the maze of chemsex, and help them achieve self-respect and structure in their lives. And yet I disagree that Chemsex is anything new. We gay men have been always been furtive about the sex we sex we want and do, and have always sought private, intoxicated spaces to do it in.

    19 September 2017 | Huffington Post
  • Heroin addiction: Why we took on this 7-day project

    We undertook this work – spreading our staff throughout courtrooms, jails, treatment facilities, finding addicts on the streets and talking to families who have lost love ones – to put the epidemic in proportion. It is massive. It has a direct or indirect impact on every one of us. It doesn’t discriminate by race, gender, age or economic background. Its insidious spread reaches every neighborhood, every township, every city, regardless of demographics.

    12 September 2017 | Cincinnati.com
  • Seven Days of Heroin: This is what an epidemic looks like

    The Enquirer sent more than 60 reporters, photographers and videographers into their communities to chronicle an ordinary week in this extraordinary time.

    12 September 2017 | Cincinnati.com
  • Injection drug users with HCV in Scotland lack awareness of DAA efficacy

    Most people who inject drugs were not aware of currently available, highly effective hepatitis C treatments, according results of a national survey in Scotland presented at the International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users. Researchers asked, “What are the chances of hepatitis C being cured with current treatment?” Most participants responded that the chance was low or less than 40%.

    12 September 2017 | Healio
  • Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs issues stark warning on funding cuts

    Funding cuts are the ‘single biggest threat’ to treatment recovery outcomes, according to the government’s own advisors, the ACMD. Maintaining funding levels for treatment is ‘essential’ for preventing drug-related deaths and crime, states Commissioning impact on drug treatment, which contains examples of funding reductions brought about by re-procurement or variations to existing contracts.

    07 September 2017 | Drink & Drug News
  • South Africa: Drug dependence isn’t a crime, it’s a medical condition

    Where South Africa has succeeded in breaking taboos and adopting people-based policies to tackle HIV infection for the general population, it has failed to provide the same humane approach to people who use drugs.

    06 September 2017 | Bhekisisa
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.