PEP: latest news

PEP resources

PEP in your own words

  • Needlestick injury

    I am an HIV-positive doctor. I was infected courtesy of a lapse in concentration and a needlestick injury at work. The prescribed dual post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) was taken for one...

    From: In your own words

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PEP news selected from other sources

  • What to Do When a Patient Admits an H.I.V. Phobia

    She had been volunteering at a drop-in center for the homeless, helping to prepare dinner, when she felt a sting in the tip of the finger and looked down to see a red mark and a dot of blood. She could not find the object that had poked her, but she knew immediately what might have happened: She had seen a few used syringes lying around the place, and perhaps one had somehow gotten into the sink and perhaps she had stuck her finger with it, and perhaps it had just been used by an H.I.V.-infected addict, and perhaps right that minute, the virus was coursing through her own veins. So of course she went to the nearest emergency room. She knew that medication taken promptly could prevent H.I.V., and she wasn’t taking any chances.

    16 September 2014 | New York Times
  • Change to recommended regimen for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP)

    The Expert Advisory Group on AIDS (EAGA) has recommended a change in the recommended regimen for post-exposure prophylaxis from tenofovir/emtricitabine with Kaletra to tenofovir/emtricitabine with raltegravir.

    11 September 2014 | Expert Advisory Group on AIDS (EAGA)
  • HIV Prevention in Clinical Care Settings - 2014 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society–USA Panel

    In an innovative approach to HIV prevention, an interdisciplinary group of experts has come together for the first time to lay out a framework of best practices to optimize the role of the clinician in achieving an AIDS-free generation.

    19 July 2014 | Journal of the American Medical Association
  • The Atlanta Principles Urge CDC to Act Now on HIV Prevention

    The document urges the CDC to address TasP, PrEP and PEP.

    11 June 2014 | Poz magazine news
  • 30 years on and still more to do to educate gay men about HIV prevention

    Thirty years after the discovery of virus, new research from NAT (National AIDS Trust) reveals that gay men are in the dark about new HIV prevention tools, with knowledge among 16-24 year olds particularly low.

    23 April 2014 | NAT press release
  • Few patients attend HIV clinic after ED visit for postexposure care

    Only half of people who were referred to HIV clinics for follow-up after presenting to the emergency department for nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis actually attended the clinic for care.

    15 April 2014 | Healio
  • Forgotten Negatives: The Limits of Treatment as Prevention

    The CDC’s High-Impact Prevention strategy takes aim at the stubborn HIV incidence rate in the United States. The only problem: it doesn’t include an ambitious plan for those at risk for the virus.

    02 April 2014 | Treatment Action Group
  • US: Activists campaign for better access to 'HIV morning-after pill'

    As rates of HIV diagnoses rise among gay men, advocates campaign to raise awareness for preventative treatment after unsafe sex.

    20 September 2013 | The Guardian
  • Adult content warning: Gary tells DirtyBOYZ about his Party Times

    From a free gay London gay scene magazine: a methamphetamine/mephedrone sx-party user talks frankly about his highs, lows and health worries.

    12 September 2013 | David Stuart
  • UNITAID launches first-ever comprehensive report on HIV prevention products

    The rate of new HIV infections in adults and adolescents has not fallen since 2007 but an unprecedented range of new products to prevent transmission of the disease could reduce the 2.5 million new HIV infections each year if they are made affordable, according to a report released today by UNITAID.

    27 August 2013 | UNITAID
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