Neurological and cognitive problems: latest news

Neurological and cognitive problems resources

  • Neuropathy - nerve pain

    Neuropathy is damage to the nerves. Nerves transmit signals within the brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system or CNS), and extend from the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Dementia

    Dementia is the loss of the ability to think, remember and work things out. It usually affects older people. But, HIV can damage the brain...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Peripheral neuropathy

    Neuropathy refers to any type of nerve damage or injury. Neuropathy is common in people with HIV and AIDS and may be related to...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Neuropathy

    Neuropathy means damage to the nerves. The nervous system consists of the central nervous system (CNS), which is comprised of the brain and the spinal...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Neurological and cognitive problems features

Neurological and cognitive problems news from aidsmap

More news

Neurological and cognitive problems news selected from other sources

  • The First HIV/AIDS Generation Reaches Retirement Age

    People with HIV and AIDS are living longer than was ever expected before the development of highly active antiretroviral therapies in the 1990s. Palm Springs, a Coachella Valley desert city 100 miles east of Los Angeles, has become a hub for older infected residents well into their 60s and 70s. Yet even as many live longer, there is a broad segment of HIV patients who are aging physically and cognitively faster than the rest of the population.

    22 September 2014 | Newsweek
  • Why HIV patients develop dementia

    Although HIV dos not infect nerve cells, researchers strongly suspect that, once activated in the brain and the spinal cord, immune cells keep up a chronic inflammation level which then results in the destruction of nerve cells.

    05 September 2014 | EATG
  • Common HIV Drug May Boost Suicide Risk

    A medication commonly used to treat HIV appears to double the risk that patients will develop suicidal thoughts or take their lives, new research contends. The finding concerns the anti-HIV drug efavirenz, which is marketed as Sustiva.

    02 July 2014 | Web MD
  • PI Therapy Raises Risk of Cerebral Small-Vessel Disease in US Group

    Treatment with HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) heightened chances of cerebral small-vessel disease (CSVD) in a group of US adults. And mild CSVD raised chances of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).

    30 May 2014 | International AIDS Society
  • New dementia adviser says thousands should be given access to experimental drugs

    In an interview with The Telegraph, the World Dementia Envoy said any promising drugs should be given to “large populations” in order to speed the search for a breakthrough - as happened decades ago in the battle against HIV.

    24 March 2014 | Daily Telegraph
  • HIV and MS: Could a Link Lead to New MS Treatment?

    The integrase inhibitor raltegravir is being tested as a treatment for multiple sclerosis. Evidence from cohort studies suggests that since the introduction of HAART people living with HIV had a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis than the general population.

    21 March 2014 | MedPage Today
  • Study Links Fitness Level and HIV-related Dementia

    A new study shows that fitness level in HIV infected individuals is related to cognitive impairment. These results suggest that something as simple as exercise may be able to stave off neurological decline in this growing segment of the aging population.

    16 December 2013 | University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Fat marker predicts cognitive decline in people with HIV

    Similarities found between HIV-associated brain damage and impairment from genetic fat-storage disease

    12 September 2013 | Johns Hopkins Medicine
  • Exercise helps with better brain functioning in HIV-infected adults

    Regular exercise is not only good for health, but can give people living with HIV a significant mental boost. This is according to a study by Dr. David J. Moore and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, published in Springer's Journal of NeuroVirology. The study found that HIV-infected adults who exercise suffered significantly less neurocognitive impairment compared to patients who do not exercise.

    14 August 2013 | Eurekalert Medicine & Health
  • HIV and illicit drugs interact to affect verbal learning and memory

    HIV infection and illicit drug use—usually smoking crack cocaine—appeared to have a compound negative impact on verbal learning and memory in a study of almost 1400 women with and without HIV in the US Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS).

    18 July 2013 | International AIDS Society
More news

Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.