There are things you can do to look after your emotional health, including talking about your experiences and feelings, connecting with others; taking part in activities you find engaging and rewarding; staying physically active; and limiting your intake of alcohol and drugs. See also our section on Mental and emotional health problems.

Mental and emotional health and wellbeing: latest news

Mental and emotional health and wellbeing resources

Mental and emotional health and wellbeing features

Mental and emotional health and wellbeing in your own words

Mental and emotional health and wellbeing news from aidsmap

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Mental and emotional health and wellbeing news selected from other sources

  • Older HIV patients struggle with loneliness and depression — and lack of services

    Older people with HIV are frequently lonely and depressed, many of them face serious housing and financial hardships, and they have high rates of physical ailments — such as chronic pain, heart disease, diabetes and fatigue — that can diminish their quality of life. All of that’s been known for several years. But services to meet their needs still fall short, say people with HIV and the groups that support them, and simply quantifying their mental and physical health problems has been a challenge.

    21 October 2018 | San Francisco Chronicle
  • Physical Activity Associated With Cognitive Benefits in Women Living With HIV

    Physical activity may protect against cognitive impairment in women living with HIV, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Infectious Disease.

    20 September 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Patients With HIV Who Develop Depression Are Unlikely to Seek Treatment

    Pharmacy TimesPatients With HIV Who Develop Depression Are Unlikely to Seek TreatmentPharmacy TimesThe study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, examined the association between the length of time a patient remains depressed and care outcomes among 5927 HIV-positive adult patients. Participants took multiple depressive severity assessments that were ...

    10 August 2018 | Pharmacy Times
  • How Are Early Members of ACT UP Adjusting Today?

    A new study assesses the long-term impact of AIDS activism, including trauma, loss, posttraumatic growth and a belief in change.

    05 June 2018 | Poz
  • Marijuana may help HIV patients keep mental stamina longer

    A chemical found in marijuana, known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, has been found to potentially slow the process in which mental decline can occur in up to 50 percent of HIV patients, says a new Michigan State University study.

    07 February 2018 | Michigan State University
  • What is AIDS Survivor Syndrome?

    Last November, long-term survivors in San Francisco—and other interested community members—gathered to hear Ron Stall, PhD, from the University of Pittsburgh, present his research on AIDS Survivor Syndrome.

    02 February 2018 | BETA blog
  • Chronic pain common in people living with HIV

    HIVMA comprehensive guidelines recommend screening everyone with HIV, offering multidisciplinary treatment focusing on non-drug options.

    14 September 2017 | EurekAlert
  • Teaching happiness to men with HIV boosts their health

    When individuals recently diagnosed with HIV were coached to practice skills to help them experience positive emotions, the result was less HIV in their blood and lower antidepressant use, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

    18 April 2017 | Eurekalert Medicine & Health
  • Discovering Your Sexual Personality In a New Era of HIV

    For the first time in generations, we have a chance to reclaim our sexual personality. For so long, sex brought death; now, sex can bring us to life again. Bur first, we have to re-teach our emotional brains. We have to break free from our chains and re-imagine our sexuality. How can we do this?

    20 February 2016 | BETA blog
  • Four Skills You Need to Successfully Manage Your HIV

    Chronic illnesses can impact anyone, the secret is to manage yours. And to do that you need some specific skills. The people who are the most successful at managing their disease often do so by thinking of their illness as a journey or a hike down a path.

    24 January 2016 | Huffington Post Canada
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