Kidney problems: latest news

Kidney problems resources

  • Conditions related to HIV treatment, metabolic changes and ageing

    Lipodystrophy is a condition which causes changes in body shape and involves fat loss or fat gain in certain parts of the body. Long-term use of some older anti-HIV...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Longer-term side-effects

    Effective HIV treatment has significantly reduced the risk of serious kidney disease in people with HIV. However, most anti-HIV drugs can cause some damage to the kidneys, so...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Other tests

    Blood pressure is the force that the beating heart causes in the arteries, veins, and blood vessels that carry blood around the body. Blood pressure is measured...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Side effects

    The most common side effects are the result of your body getting used to a new drug. After a few weeks, these side effects usually...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Health checks

    Staff at your HIV clinic use various tests to keep an eye on your HIV. Many of these tests are done on samples of your...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • The kidneys

    Kidneys remove waste products from our bodies.Kidney disease can be caused by inflammation in the filter, diabetes and high blood pressure.Some HIV treatments have been...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Kidney toxicity

    The kidneys are two organs that sit in the small of the back on either side of the spinal cord. The kidneys filter toxic substances from...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Kidney problems features

Kidney problems news from aidsmap

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Kidney problems news selected from other sources

  • Ask A Pharmacist: With a new tenofovir, should you switch to Descovy, Genvoya or Odefsey?

    I’ve heard more than a few patients ask, what should I do? If I’m already taking Complera, Stribild or Truvada, should I switch to the newer drug formulation with tenofovir alafenamide (TAF)?

    20 September 2016 | BETA blog
  • Not So Fast: Do people with HIV really experience accelerated aging?

    Recent talk about HIV and aging has almost always been scary. A number of studies conclude that people living with HIV have so-called “accelerated aging”—meaning they will suffer heart attacks, strokes, cancers, and osteoporosis more often and sooner than those without HIV. Well, this is one article on aging and HIV that will challenge the concept of people living with HIV having an early expiration date. Instead, we can look at what we know and what we don’t, to get a better idea of what the risks are for HIV-positive people growing older—and what they can do about them.

    08 July 2016 | Positively Aware
  • HIV-to-HIV Organ Transplants Moving Forward

    Multicenter study preparing for launch, pilot studies already begun

    04 July 2016 | MedPage Today
  • A question of timing: A lawsuit claims Gilead Sciences could have developed a less-harmful version of its HIV treatment sooner

    More than a decade ago, researchers at Gilead Sciences thought they had a breakthrough: a new version of the company’s key HIV medicine that was less toxic to kidneys and bones. But in 2004 Gilead executives stopped the research, only to restart it as the expiration of tenofovir’s patent in 2018 neared.

    30 May 2016 | Los Angeles Times
  • HIV-infected organs transplanted at Birmingham hospital

    A Birmingham hospital has successfully transplanted two HIV infected organs into patients also suffering from the disease. Liver transplants, from two separate donors, were carried out at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Edgbaston, in the pioneering procedures. Whilst one patient donated both kidneys in surgery performed at Guy’s Hospital, in London.

    19 May 2016 | Birmingham Mail
  • In a first, liver and kidney from HIV-infected donor are transplanted into HIV-positive patients

    In a first that gives HIV-positive patients yet another chance for long lives, surgeons at Johns Hopkins University Medical Center have transplanted a kidney and a liver from a deceased donor who was positive for HIV into two HIV-positive recipients.

    31 March 2016 | Los Angeles Times
  • Johns Hopkins approved to perform first HIV-positive to HIV-positive organ transplants in U.S.

    Johns Hopkins recently received approval from the United Network for Organ Sharing to be the first hospital in the United States to perform HIV-positive to HIV-positive organ transplants. The institution will be the first in the nation to do an HIV-positive kidney transplant and the first in the world to execute an HIV-positive liver transplant.

    09 February 2016 | Johns Hopkins Medicine
  • NIH publishes criteria for research on organ transplantation between people with HIV infection

    ​In a Federal Register notice on Nov. 25, 2015, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services published safeguards and criteria for research to assess the safety and effectiveness of solid organ transplantation from donors with HIV infection to recipients with HIV infection.

    27 November 2015 | National Institutes of Health
  • TAF and TDF Compared for Kidney, Bone Toxicity in Black HIV+ Patients

    Including tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) in single-tablet elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine (E/C/F/TAF) is associated with reduced renal and bone toxicity compared to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-containing single-tablet (E/C/F/TDF) therapy, according to an analysis of data from two Phase 3 trials, reported at IDWeek 2015.

    12 October 2015 | Monthly Prescribing Reference
  • Tenofovir Alafenamide Combo Pill Matches Truvada for HIV Efficacy, but Easier on Bones and Kidneys

    A fixed-dose combination pill containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) worked as well in a Phase 3 trial as the current Truvada pill containing the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) -- which is used for both HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP -- but causes less kidney and bone toxicity, according to an announcement this week from Gilead Sciences.

    04 September 2015 | HIVandHepatitis.com
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Our information levels explained

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  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
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See also

Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.