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  • New HIV diagnoses in MSM in high-income countries

    The UK and Australia have experienced recent all-time highs in new HIV diagnoses in MSM, however in Canada and New Zealand, diagnoses are stable. Tony Kirby reports.

    15 December 2014 | The Lancet Infectious Diseases (requires free registration)
  • Recommendations for HIV prevention with adults and adolescents with HIV in the United States, 2014

    This updated guideline is a comprehensive compilation of new and longstanding federal recommendations about biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions that can help reduce the risk of HIV transmission from persons with HIV by reducing their infectiousness and their risk of exposing others to HIV.

    15 December 2014 | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • How San Francisco Is Getting to Zero On HIV

    San Francisco is already making progress when it comes to HIV prevention, treatment and retention. In 2006, San Francisco had 517 new HIV cases; by 2013, that number dropped to 359, a 30 percent decrease. The number of deaths almost halved between 2006 and 2013, going from 327 to 182. Additionally, compared to the United States, San Francisco is faring better in multiple aspects of the HIV care continuum: in 2012, 82 percent of HIV positive individuals in the U.S. were aware of their status; in San Francisco, that number was 94 percent.

    11 December 2014 | Huffington Post
  • Sophisticated HIV diagnostics adapted for remote areas

    Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1.

    10 December 2014 | Science Daily
  • The Best Way to Beat AIDS Isn't Drug Treatment. It's a Living Wage

    Being poor is a more accurate predictor of HIV than being male, female, Black or Hispanic is. A 2010 study of poor urban areas found that race and gender were not significant predictors of HIV prevalence. Why then are our proposed solutions for a problem with economic roots overwhelmingly clinical?

    08 December 2014 | New Republic
  • CDC Analyzes Impediments to Viral Suppression in People With HIV

    The CDC has reframed the HIV treatment cascade figures to highlight the various reasons why only 30 percent of Americans have a fully suppressed virus.

    03 December 2014 | POZ
  • HIV Care Saves Lives (infographics)

    While we have made progress in HIV prevention and care, only 30% of all people living with HIV have achieved viral suppression. If people are in HIV medical care, however, 76% of people achieve viral suppression. Getting and keeping people in HIV medical care saves lives.

    26 November 2014 | CDC Vital Signs
  • Only three in 10 Americans have HIV under control: government report

    Just 30 percent of Americans living with HIV have the virus in check, putting others at risk of infection, U.S. health officials said yesterday. The report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 840,000 of the 1.2 million people infected with HIV in 2011 were not consistently taking anti-HIV drugs that keep the virus suppressed at very low levels.

    26 November 2014 | Reuters
  • Rumours of the demise of HIV have been greatly exaggerated

    Two years ago, the “beginning of the end” of AIDS was announced. It included the promise of reducing HIV transmission by reducing the amount of infectious virus in the population. But disease control will fail unless we understand and plan for its translation within complex and adaptive systems. People take up technologies and use them in unanticipated ways. Cultures develop resistance in the same way that bacteria do. We will only ever approach the beginning of the end of AIDS if and when we bear these things in mind.

    25 November 2014 | The Conversation
  • Narrow Time Window Exists to Start HIV Therapy, Study Shows

    HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

    25 November 2014 | Infection Control Today
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