How transmission occurs: latest news

How transmission occurs resources

  • Sex

    Having HIV can affect people’s feelings about sex in many different ways. Some people become anxious about passing HIV on, or feel less desirable. While some people go...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sexual transmission of HIV

    HIV can be passed on from one person to another during sex. How likely it is that this will happen during one sexual act varies, depending on...

    From: Living with HIV

    Information level Level 2
  • Oral sex

    Many men and women find oral sex an intensely pleasurable experience. People use different terms to refer to oral sex (including formal terms like fellatio...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Transmission and viral load

    There is less risk of passing on HIV if your viral load is undetectable because you are taking anti-HIV drugs. Not all scientists agree on...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Transmission facts

    HIV can only be passed on when one person's body fluids get inside another person. HIV can be passed on during sex without a condom,...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Risk

    An examination of prosecuted behaviours, using scientific evidence to determine actual risk, and how this evidence has been applied in jurisdictions worldwide....

    From: HIV & the criminal law

    Information level Level 4
  • How transmission occurs

    HIV can be transmitted through – and, as far as essentially all evidence shows, only through – several well-established routes: By sharing injecting equipment By...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4

How transmission occurs features

How transmission occurs in your own words

  • Bored and horny

    It’s Sunday afternoon and it’s raining. I’m bored and horny. However, I’ve got £20 left over from the night before and this will be enough...

    From: In your own words

How transmission occurs news from aidsmap

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How transmission occurs news selected from other sources

  • CDC Director Compares Ebola to AIDS. But How Similar Are They?

    CDC director Tom Frieden says this about Ebola: "The only thing like this has been AIDS." In fact, the two viruses share similarities but also have big differences.

    17 October 2014 | Poz magazine news
  • What we know about transmission of the Ebola virus among humans

    The Ebola virus is transmitted among humans through close and direct physical contact with infected bodily fluids, the most infectious being blood, faeces and vomit.

    08 October 2014 | World Health Organization
  • Are "Sugar Daddies" to Blame for HIV Transmission in Africa?

    It was long assumed that a major driver of the vastly greater prevalence of HIV infection in Zimbabwe, South Africa and other epicenters of the African HIV epidemic is intergeneratioal sex - sepcifically, young women having sexual realtionships with older "sugar daddies". Contrary to expectations, a recent high-quality, longitudinal study showed that participation in intergenerational sex did not impact the likelihood of contracting HIV infection.

    05 September 2014 | Scientific American
  • Does the global HIV response understand anal sex?

    Stigma, squeamishness and misunderstanding of anal sex is leading to research gaps and inaccurate information about the risks of this common sexual behaviour, and hindering effective HIV/AIDS prevention strategies, experts say. A move towards "sex positive" approaches could enhance social acceptance and increase protection.

    28 August 2014 | IRIN
  • What’s Your Long-term Risk of Transmitting HIV?

    How mathematical models can help us better understand both the long-term probability of HIV transmission and the benefit of combining risk-reduction strategies.

    04 July 2014 | Poz
  • HIV transmission risks: Review updates CDC estimates, adds impact of treatment, condom use

    Authors of a comprehensive review of literature reporting data on per-act HIV transmission risks have updated the last estimates produced by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2005, and in the process have highlighted the importance of treatment and prevention reaching those at greatest risk.

    05 June 2014 | Science Speaks
  • Uganda's struggle with schistosomiasis

    Efforts are underway to rid Uganda of the scourge of schistosomiasis but provision of clean water and good sanitation lags behind treatment efforts. The disease is linked to increased infection rates of HIV among girls.

    16 May 2014 | The Lancet
  • A Simple Theory, and a Proposal, on HIV in Africa

    Norwegian researchers believe that African women are more vulnerable to H.I.V. because of a chronic, undiagnosed parasitic disease: genital schistosomiasis. Also known as bilharzia and snail fever, it is caused by parasitic worms picked up in infested river water. It is marked by fragile sores in the far reaches of the vaginal canal that may serve as entry points for H.I.V.

    11 May 2014 | New York Times
  • How a House Finch Disease Reshaped What We Know About Epidemics

    One team of researchers was able to study a highly virulent disease in House Finches. Their recent paper in PLOS Biology sheds light on what makes some disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, more harmful than others.

    30 January 2014 | Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  • Bursting HIV’s bubble

    HIV has a fatty outer membrane similar to that surrounding a living cell. This membrane probably acts like a balloon—in other words the pressure inside it is greater than the pressure outside it. That means it can be burst, which is what some scientists believe provides the driving force by which a virus injects its genetic material into a cell in order to infect it.

    18 October 2013 | The Economist
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