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How HIV causes disease: latest news

How HIV causes disease resources

  • Health issues

    If you are ‘HIV positive’ this means that you have a virus called HIV in your body. It doesn’t mean that you are ill, or that...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • CD4 cell counts

    T-cells (or T-lymphocytes) are white blood cells that play important roles in the immune system. There are two main types of T-cells. One type has...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and the immune system

    The immune system is the body’s natural defence system. It’s a network of cells, tissues and organs inside the body.The immune system recognises and fights...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • CD4 and viral load

    It’s important for all people with HIV to take regular blood tests. The two most important blood tests are for CD4 and viral load.A CD4...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • The immune system and HIV

    A description of how the immune system works, its response to HIV, and factors affecting disease progression....

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Immune system cells

    The human immune system protects the body against foreign objects, such as micro-organisms. It is made of many different cells that are spread throughout the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2

How HIV causes disease features

How HIV causes disease news from aidsmap

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How HIV causes disease news selected from other sources

  • HIV vaccines should avoid viral target cells, primate model study suggests

    Vaccines designed to protect against HIV can backfire and lead to increased rates of infection. This unfortunate effect has been seen in more than one vaccine clinical trial. Scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have newly published results that support a straightforward explanation for the backfire effect: vaccination may increase the number of immune cells that serve as viral targets.

    04 January 2015 | EurekAlert
  • Could HIV make hearing worse?

    A new study has found that low- and high-frequency hearing is poorer in adults with the human immunodeficiency virus, compared with adults who do not have the disease. Although unexpected, similar hearing loss has previously been observed to be more likely in adults with diabetes mellitus. "It is possible that both HIV infection and diabetes, being systemic diseases, could affect the neural function of the cochlea," the authors suggest.

    29 December 2014 | Medical News Today
  • Starting HIV Meds Within a Year of Infection Helps Restore CD4s

    Beginning treatment for HIV within a year of infection improves the likelihood of returning an individual’s CD4 count to a normal level.

    03 December 2014 | AIDSMeds
  • HIV virulence depends on where virus inserts itself in host DNA

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can insert itself at different locations in the DNA of its human host -- and this specific integration site determines how quickly the disease progresses, report researchers at KU Leuven's Laboratory for Molecular Virology and Gene Therapy. The study was published online today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

    13 November 2014 | Leuven University, via Eurekalert
  • The genetics of coping with HIV

    We respond to infections in two fundamental ways. One is 'resistance,' where the body attacks the invading pathogen and reduces its numbers. Another, which is much less well understood, is 'tolerance,' where the body tries to minimize the damage done by the pathogen. A study using data from a large Swiss cohort of HIV-infected individuals gives us a glimpse into why some people cope with HIV better than others.

    12 November 2014 | Science Daily
  • Immune cells proposed as HIV hideout don't last in primate model

    The type of immune cell called macrophages, which have been proposed as a 'sanctuary site' of HIV in the brain and other organs, and as a possible cause of HIV-related brain impairment, don't live long enough to serve as reservoirs of HIV, a study in PLoS Pathogens finds.

    04 November 2014 | EATG
  • HIV's infection tactics could guide AIDS vaccine, study finds

    New research that sheds light on the methods and machinery used by HIV to infect cells provides insight into the tricky virus that potentially could guide the development of a vaccine against the virus that causes AIDS, according to U.S. government and other scientists.

    09 October 2014 | Reuters
  • Dynamic motion of HIV as it readies an attack: Seen in real time, for the first time

    Technologies that allow investigators, for the first time, to watch what they call the 'dance' of HIV proteins on the virus' surface, which may contribute to how the virus infects human immune cells, have been developed by scientists. The new technology platform opens new possibilities for devising an approach to prevent HIV infection, note researchers

    09 October 2014 | Science Daily
  • The genetics of coping with HIV

    We respond to infections in two fundamental ways. One is 'resistance,' where the body attacks the invading pathogen and reduces its numbers. Another, which is much less well understood, is 'tolerance,' where the body tries to minimize the damage done by the pathogen. A study using data from a large Swiss cohort of HIV-infected individuals gives us a glimpse into why some people cope with HIV better than others.

    17 September 2014 | Science Daily
  • Protein tethers HIV and Ebola to cells

    A family of proteins that helps viruses, such as HIV and Ebola, enter a cell also can block the release of those viruses. When HIV-1 or any virus infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. One type of cellular protein—T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1—has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. Researchers have now discovered that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of such viruses. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “This is a surprising finding that provides new insights into our understanding of not only HIV infection, but also that of Ebola and other viruses,” says Shan-Lu Liu, associate professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at University of Missouri.

    26 August 2014 | Futurity
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Our information levels explained

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  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.