The types of tests used to monitor health can be expensive. Alternative ways of assessing patient health and making decisions about treatment and care are an important aspect of health care in resource-limited settings. This can include taking a detailed patient history and performing a physical examination.

Health monitoring in resource-limited settings: latest news

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Health monitoring in resource-limited settings news selected from other sources

  • Access to on-the-spot testing led to improved rates of treatment for infants with HIV

    Tests to detect HIV in infants conducted at health facilities where they received care led to a significant increase in the percentage of infants with the virus given access to life-saving treatment, compared to tests analyzed in central laboratories, according to a report in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

    22 August 2018 | Science Speaks
  • Price Of HIV Viral Load Test Falls, Raising Hopes In Global AIDS Fight

    The Clinton Health Access Initiative, along with several other development agencies, has brokered an agreement to make routine HIV tests more accessible. They're aiming to make HIV viral load tests available for $12 a piece, slashing the price in some markets by more than 50 percent.

    02 August 2018 | NPR
  • Hologic's Global Access Initiative Increases Availability of Diagnostic Testing in Resource-Limited Countries

    Hologic, Inc. announced today the launch of the new Hologic Global Access Initiative, in partnership with the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) and MedAccess (backed by the U.K. government), to increase affordable access to molecular testing for HIV, hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) in nearly 50 nations around the world. These countries, primarily across Africa and Southeast Asia, make up 90 percent of the HIV disease burden globally.

    25 July 2018 | Hologic press release
  • Commentary on U=U campaign - Follow Up on previous article 'On Fear, Infectiousness and Undetectability'

    Last week, GNP+ published a statement offering an alternative perspective on the messaging of campaigns on the uninfectiousness of people living with HIV who achieve viral suppression, including the U=U (Undetectable = Untransmittable) campaign. Following reactions from supporters of the campaign, GNP+ releases the following statement clarifying our position on this important issue.

    15 February 2017 | GNPPlus
  • HIV viral load testing capacities progress, require global support, multiple partners to reach 90-90-90 goals

    Four of seven sub-Saharan African countries followed by researchers over the last year and a half now can track the effectiveness of HIV treatment among all patients receiving it with tests to measure the levels of virus in their bodies at least once a year, according to an update in last week’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

    06 December 2016 | Science Speaks
  • HIV test performed on USB stick

    The device, created by scientists at Imperial College London and DNA Electronics, uses a drop of blood to detect HIV, and then creates an electrical signal that can be read by a computer, laptop or handheld device. The disposable test could be used for HIV patients to monitor their own treatment.

    11 November 2016 | Imperial College
  • Africa has an essential medicines list. Now it needs one for diagnostics

    An essential diagnostics list would detail diagnostic tests that should be available to people who need them. These could range from point-of-care tests in physicians’ offices or in pharmacies to high-complexity tests in reference laboratories. The end result would be a health system where people were more accurately diagnosed and treated, where disease outbreaks could be identified earlier, and diagnostic tests performed according to a high standard.

    27 October 2016 | The Conversation
  • HIV effort let down by test shortages, says WHO

    A shortage of HIV testing could undermine global efforts to diagnose and treat people with the infection, warn experts from the World Health Organization.

    24 August 2016 | BBC Health
  • Alere HIV Combo Test Receives WHO Prequalification

    Alere, a global leader in rapid diagnostics, today announced that its Alere HIV Combo, a rapid point-of-care fourth-generation test that detects both HIV-1/2 antibodies and the HIV-1 p24 antigen, has been awarded World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification, making it available for public sector procurement in resource-limited countries.

    17 July 2016 | Alere press release
  • Challenges Loom for Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    POC is likely to grow in emerging markets, where limited resources and local conditions make traditional lab-based testing less practical.

    13 July 2016 | Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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