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  • Starting HIV Meds Within a Year of Infection Helps Restore CD4s

    Beginning treatment for HIV within a year of infection improves the likelihood of returning an individual’s CD4 count to a normal level.

    03 December 2014 | AIDSMeds
  • IRIS uncommon when ART starts in 96,000-person EuropeUS study

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) appears to be rare when antiretroviral-naive adults in Europe and the United States start ART, with the possible exception of mycobacterial infections.

    01 December 2014 | International AIDS Society
  • START Study Could Change How We Look at HIV Treatment, and HIV Itself

    Have you heard of the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) study? In my opinion, it is probably the most important study currently running. It generates strong views, both for and against initiating antiretroviral therapy early, but the results are likely to be surprising.

    25 November 2014 | The Body
  • Narrow Time Window Exists to Start HIV Therapy, Study Shows

    HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

    25 November 2014 | Infection Control Today
  • HIV Drug Development Pipeline Update, Fall 2014 Edition

    HIV treatment remains far from perfect, and there are still seats at the table available for improved antiretrovirals. At IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia, Paul Sax, M.D., made the case for this new generation of drugs, and provided an update on several of the most noteworthy candidates currently in development.

    17 November 2014 | The Body Pro
  • Scientists see mechanism for spontaneous HIV 'cure'

    French scientists claimed Tuesday to have found the genetic mechanism for a "spontaneous cure" in two HIV-infected men, proposing a new strategy for combating AIDS even as other experts urged caution.

    10 November 2014 | AFP / Yahoo News
  • Innovation in fixed-dose combos: HIV/AIDS therapeutics edition

    FDC drug development is evolving rapidly as the industry gains experience in manufacturing them and ushering them through the review process. The laws have changed towards a more favorable marketing climate. And finally, it is clear that FDCs are more than a way to improve adherence—though that will always be a prominent consideration. FDCs can shift the standard of care towards a more tolerable, patient-friendly, value-oriented approach to treatment, and in the final analysis, that approach to development bodes well for companies, payers, and most importantly, patients.

    07 November 2014 | BioPharma Dive
  • Viral Load Reductions Persist With Less Efavirenz for HIV

    The virologic responses with reduced-dose efavirenz at 48 weeks have proven durable out to 96 weeks, ENCORE1 study results show.

    07 November 2014 | Medscape (requires free registration)
  • Immune cells proposed as HIV hideout don't last in primate model

    The type of immune cell called macrophages, which have been proposed as a 'sanctuary site' of HIV in the brain and other organs, and as a possible cause of HIV-related brain impairment, don't live long enough to serve as reservoirs of HIV, a study in PLoS Pathogens finds.

    04 November 2014 | EATG
  • How Will Generic Drugs Affect HIV Treatment in the U.S.?

    In the U.S., in that many of the antiretroviral drugs that are commonly used today are approaching their patent expirations. So we can begin to conceptualize the use of generics in the U.S. and the potential cost savings. An Interview With Treatment Action Group's Tim Horn.

    31 October 2014 | The Body
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