HIV prevention policy: latest news

HIV prevention policy resources

HIV prevention policy features

HIV prevention policy news from aidsmap

More news

HIV prevention policy news selected from other sources

  • EXCLUSIVE: Government confirms it will not cut HIV prevention budget

    The Government has refuted claims that it was to halve its HIV prevention budget for 2015, reiterating support for the strategy and saying “It will continue”.

    7 hours ago | PinkNews
  • Adult Film Industry Loses Appeal Over Los Angeles' Condom Law

    The 9th Circuit decides that making porn actors wear condoms doesn't run afoul of the First Amendment

    17 December 2014 | Hollywood Reporter
  • Six Lessons for Health Departments Using PrEP as an HIV Prevention Tool

    In Washington State, we’ve spent a lot of time talking about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the use of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection, and what it means for our work.

    15 December 2014 | National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors
  • New HIV diagnoses in MSM in high-income countries

    The UK and Australia have experienced recent all-time highs in new HIV diagnoses in MSM, however in Canada and New Zealand, diagnoses are stable. Tony Kirby reports.

    15 December 2014 | The Lancet Infectious Diseases (requires free registration)
  • NAT opposes 50% cut to national HIV prevention funding for England

    The Government has announced that there will be devastating cuts to funding for the national HIV prevention programme in England.  Funding will be halved for the year commencing April 2015 and there is as yet no commitment to fund further years of the programme.  

    15 December 2014 | NAT press release
  • Recommendations for HIV prevention with adults and adolescents with HIV in the United States, 2014

    This updated guideline is a comprehensive compilation of new and longstanding federal recommendations about biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions that can help reduce the risk of HIV transmission from persons with HIV by reducing their infectiousness and their risk of exposing others to HIV.

    15 December 2014 | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • National HIV Prevention Funding – An essential investment

    The Government is reducing funding for HIV prevention by 50% from 2015. There is no indication that HIV transmission rates in England are reducing and there continue to be major gaps in public understanding of how to prevent HIV. HIV prevention funding must remain at least at current levels.

    12 December 2014 | National AIDS Trust
  • How San Francisco Is Getting to Zero On HIV

    San Francisco is already making progress when it comes to HIV prevention, treatment and retention. In 2006, San Francisco had 517 new HIV cases; by 2013, that number dropped to 359, a 30 percent decrease. The number of deaths almost halved between 2006 and 2013, going from 327 to 182. Additionally, compared to the United States, San Francisco is faring better in multiple aspects of the HIV care continuum: in 2012, 82 percent of HIV positive individuals in the U.S. were aware of their status; in San Francisco, that number was 94 percent.

    11 December 2014 | Huffington Post
  • Blinded by Fear: How Politics Influenced Medical Policy in Greece

    There is no one particular reason for Greece’s stringent policies on HIV. Rather, the combination of political power plays, economic instability, and societal fear planted the seeds for criminalization of the disease.

    10 December 2014 | The Politic
  • Uganda: Emphasising evidence-based prevention technologies a better deal

    On World AIDS Day President Yoweri Museveni told Ugandan youth to fight AIDS by not having sex and blamed evidence-based prevention interventions, in particular, condoms and medical male circumcision on Uganda’s troubled AIDS response. He also said becoming HIV-positive brings shame to a family. These off-the-cuff comments cause more harm than good.

    10 December 2014 | New Vision
More news

Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.