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  • Rare Ocular Syphilis Strikes Six, Blinding Two, in Washington State

    Washington State health officials have reported a cluster of rare syphilis infections of the eyes — detected in six people, two of them stricken blind. Three are HIV-positive.

    30 January 2015 | AIDSMeds
  • Condom advert – HIV prevention or infidelity promotion?

    Controversy over an advert on condom use to prevent HIV among married couples led by a cross section of Kenyan religious leaders has left many HIV activists astonished at the ‘denial of reality’.

    27 January 2015 | Key Correspondents
  • How to Talk to Your Partner About Using PrEP

    Talking about PrEP with your partner can open up a can of worms. Here's how to make the conversation as smooth as possible.

    27 January 2015 | HIV Plus
  • The Quest Workshop for Black and Minority Ethnic Gay and Bisexual Men

    Public Health England (PHE) has commissioned The Quest to deliver its flagship “The Quest Workshop”, aimed at reducing health risk behaviour and building resilience, to Black African, Black Caribbean, mixed Black and other ethnicity (BME) gay and bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM). As part of the project, The Quest will be delivering two workshops in London and one in Manchester. The first set of workshops will be taking place in March 2015.

    21 January 2015 | The Quest
  • Five Reasons His HIV Status Doesn't Matter Anymore

    In one of the bright spots of the new year, 2015, the HIV status of the guy you’re dying to get into bed matters less than ever.

    19 January 2015 | Queerty
  • The Latest Study on Depo-Provera and HIV: Far More Complex Than Most Headlines Suggest

    A newly published study is stirring up questions about the relationship between Depo-Provera, and other progestogen-only injectable contraceptives, and the risk of HIV acquisition among HIV-negative women. The study triggered a wave of headlines and tweets that boiled down the complexities and caveats of this analysis into an oversimplified statement: Depo increases women’s risk of HIV by 40 percent.

    14 January 2015 | RH Reality Check
  • Contraceptive injection raises risk of HIV, research warns

    Lancet analysis finds 40% increase in infection risk for women using birth control jab compared with other hormonal methods.

    09 January 2015 | The Guardian
  • New York City's public health 'warrior' revamps HIV messaging

    Beneath Grand Central Station, the doors of a downtown 6 train open to reveal one of the New York City Department of Health's newest public service announcements: A simple poster with two young men embracing tenderly urges riders to take an HIV test. The execution of this particular campaign is novel, a departure from the city’s past HIV displays. Previously, ominous and dramatic messaging reigned, akin to the lurid anti-smoking campaigns.

    04 January 2015 | Al-Jazeera America
  • Uganda: study finds that 35% of university students are HIV-positive

    As the government continues to battle the spread of HIV – the virus that causes Aids – in Uganda, a new report indicates that a little over a third of students of Ugandan universities are HIV positive.

    04 January 2015 | New Vision
  • South Africa: Silent Suffering - Men and HIV (Video)

    Why are South African men reluctant to test for HIV, to start and stay on ART, and to join support groups? Is it that health services are not men-friendly? Is it an idea of masculinity that mandates men to be stoic, to hide pain as a weakness and not to talk about their feelings? What defines the relationship of men to health services and how can it be improved? In this video by Davison Mudzingwa, experts and activists like Thamela, analyze the factors that drive men’s gendered vulnerability to HIV in South Africa and suggest ways to reduce it.

    23 December 2014 | IPS
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