HATIP blog

The TB activist agenda in southern Africa: more from the South African TB conference

Theo Smart
Published: 18 June 2012

Participants at the Treatment Action Campaign, SECTION27, Médecins Sans Frontières and Oxfam pre-meeting we mentioned last week identified five crucial interventions to reduce TB cases and mortality in South Africa.;

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Register for `Transforming the HIV/TB response: Defining the next 10 years`

Published: 18 June 2012

WHO’s STOP TB programme is organising a consultation immediately prior to AIDS 2012 in Washington DC, in order to generate innovative ideas on the next ten years of the HIV/TB response. The consultation will be co-hosted by Diane Havlir of University of San Francisco and the Chair of the Global TB/HIV Working Group and co-Chair of AIDS 2012 and Mark Dybul of the Georgetown University and George W Bush Institute and formerly the US Global AIDS Coordinator, and convened by Haileyesus Getahun of the Stop TB Department of WHO.;

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Six months of South African TB activism

Theo Smart
Published: 15 June 2012

Whenever a major HIV and TB conference takes place in South Africa, one has come to expect a significant activist presence — and at least under the current minister of health — engagement. With groups like the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) — arguably the most renowned treatment activist organization since ACT UP New York — and its natural allies, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) and Section 27 (the legal wonks formerly known as the AIDS Law Project), activism and campaigns are sometimes as much on show as the clinical science — and often far more impactful.;

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Working together to call for better TB lab technologies

Theo Smart
Published: 13 June 2012

A key issue expected to be highlighted at the 3rd South African TB Conference this week in Durban is demand for new TB diagnostics and new approaches to managing TB.;

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