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  • UNITAID will invest to enable universal HIV care for children

    The UNITAID Executive Board finished its twenty-first meeting and decided that UNITAID will invest up to $63 million through the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation to bring early infant diagnosis for HIV to the heart of communities in nine African countries. This will pave the way to universal access for testing and enable a ten-fold increase in treatment, thus transforming global childhood HIV/AIDS. Initiating treatment before the twelfth week of life reduces HIV-related mortality by 75%.

    17 December 2014 | UNITAID
  • Adolescents born with HIV must be told their status

    Petronella Sampa Nsomfwa was born with HIV, but wasn't told of her status by her parents before they died. On the launch of a new report she calls on families to be open with their adolescent children about their HIV status.

    15 December 2014 | Key Correspondents
  • PEPFAR’s ‘Global Pediatric ARV Commitment-To-Action’ Aims To Improve Drug Access

    Since the start of President Obama’s Administration, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has achieved a four-fold increase and is now providing 7.7 million people with life-saving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment worldwide. Despite this, only 1 in 4 of the 3.2 million children living with HIV/AIDS worldwide are today receiving treatment.

    09 December 2014 | US Department of State
  • I’m living with HIV, but it doesn’t define me

    When I was 13, my doctor sat me down and told me that I was HIV-positive. Sitting next to me, my mum was silent, in denial of the virus that she had unknowingly passed to me.

    07 December 2014 | The Guardian
  • How PrEP Helped One HIV-Negative Woman Become a Mother

    All Poppy Morgan of San Francisco wanted was to see her husband, Ted, reflected in their child's face. Unfortunately, for many years, this could not be a reality. Ted was HIV positive, and Poppy could not find a way to conceive safely. After many disappointments, including a brief hope for sperm washing that was quickly dashed, Poppy found pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

    26 November 2014 | The Body
  • AIDS is No. 1 Killer of African Teenagers

    HIV among teenagers is devastating families in Nigeria and elsewhere in Africa, where AIDS has become the leading cause of death among adolescents. One reason for this shocking teen death toll is the low number of adolescents on antiretroviral treatment (ART).

    25 November 2014 | Inter Press Service
  • NNRTI + 3 NRTIs may be strong first regimen in UK/Ireland children

    Children starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) with a nonnucleoside (NNRTI) plus 3 nucleosides (NRTIs) had the lowest 2-year virologic failure rate in a study of 997 children in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Five-year toxicity rates were similar with the NNRTI and protease inhibitor (PI) regimens studied.

    24 November 2014 | International AIDS Society
  • Okay to breastfeed while taking lamivudine or tenofovir: Study

    Lamivudine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) are safe for breastfeeding women, according to a new review of the evidence.

    04 November 2014 | Consultant 360
  • Magnetic Love and Making Healthy Babies - Carolina's story

    Carolina describes her use of pre-exposure prophylaxis in order to have a baby with her HIV-positive partner.

    02 October 2014 | My PrEP Experience (blog)
  • Malawi First Country to Put HIV Positive Pregnant Women On ARVs

    President Arthur Peter Mutharika says Malawi was the first country to adopt a policy of putting all HIV positive pregnant and breast feeding women on anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs regardless of their CD4 Count.

    02 September 2014 | AllAfrica
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