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  • UNAIDS reports that reaching Fast-Track Targets will avert nearly 28 million new HIV infections and end the AIDS epidemic as a global health threat by 2030

    If the world does not rapidly scale up in the next five years, the epidemic is likely to spring back with a higher rate of new HIV infections than today, UNAIDS says.

    19 November 2014 | UNAIDS
  • One in eight gay men in London has HIV, official figures show

    One in eight gay men in London has HIV according to figures released today, which reveal the disease is three times more prevalent in the capital than the rest of the country.

    19 November 2014 | Evening Standard
  • South Africa to spend $2.2 billion on HIV drugs in next two years

    South Africa plans to spend $2.2 billion over two years to buy HIV/AIDS drugs for public hospitals, a government minister said on Monday, as a study shows the prevalence of the virus is rising.

    18 November 2014 | Reuters
  • Uganda fails to keep up with demand for HIV drugs

    Despite a remarkable increase in access to HIV treatment over the last decade, the number of people in need of antiretroviral drugs in Uganda continues to outpace the response.

    20 October 2014 | Key Correspondents
  • Selling the End of AIDS

    As slogans anticipating an end to the AIDS epidemic gain popularity, skeptics worry that such promises are hollow and unrealistically ambitious, and that failure to deliver will ultimately set back efforts to combat HIV.

    01 October 2014 | Poz
  • Doctor treats Ebola with HIV drug in Liberia - seemingly successfully

    A doctor in rural Liberia inundated with Ebola patients says he's had good results with a treatment he tried out of sheer desperation: an HIV drug. Dr. Gobee Logan has given the drug, lamivudine, to 15 Ebola patients, and all but two survived. That's a 7% mortality rate whereas across West Africa, the virus has killed 70% of its victims.

    27 September 2014 | CNN
  • Southern states are now epicenter of HIV/AIDS in the US

    The original face of AIDS was that of a middle-class, often white, gay man living in New York or San Francisco. That picture has changed over time as people of color have become disproportionately affected by the epidemic. Today, the face of AIDS is black or Latino, poor, often rural — and Southern.

    23 September 2014 | Washington Post
  • US: CDC Posts 2014 State HIV Prevention Progress Report

    A new report shows that a number of states have already met or exceeded the national goals for 2015 for some indicators, the results show the need for improvement on one or more indicators in each and every state. In addition, overall, there is a wide gap in the results between states on most measures, indicating that people in some states are not benefiting equally from advances in HIV care and prevention.

    23 September 2014 | blog.aids.gov
  • AIDS Progress in South Africa in Peril

    PEPFAR has poured more than $3 billion into South Africa, largely for training doctors, building clinics and laboratories, and buying drugs. Now that aid pipeline is drying up as the program shifts its limited budget to poorer countries, so the South African government must find hundreds of millions of dollars, even as its national caseload grows rapidly.

    26 August 2014 | New York Times
  • New report finds missing and incomplete data imperils the global HIV/AIDS response

    A new report from amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, and AVAC outlines the need for a new approach to tracking data to guide the key decisions that shape the response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Critical and expensive decisions made with incomplete data are undermining the response—even as the systems for collecting this data continue to improve, the report found.

    21 August 2014 | AVAC
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