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  • Unsafe drug use behind HIV boom in Malaysian fishermen

    Twelve per cent of Malaysian fishermen tested HIV positive — a figure that rose to 24 per cent among injection drug users. In comparison, just one in every 200 people is HIV positive in the general Malaysian population.

    25 August 2015 | Sci.dev.net
  • New HIV cases soar in Florida

    The number of reported HIV cases in Florida has jumped 23 percent so far this year, the biggest increase in a continuing upward trend that began in 2012 after several years of decreases. The proportion of Floridians infected with the disease is at its highest in seven years. Experts say the reasons include a decreased fear of dying from AIDS, subpar attempts at safe-sex education and disease prevention, and increased use of injected drugs such as heroin.

    07 August 2015 | South Florida Sun-Sentinel
  • San Francisco Sees Declines in New HIV Infections and Deaths of People with HIV

    Experts agree that the decline in new infections is due to a combination of factors including widespread testing, early antiretroviral therapy (ART), and possibly pre-exposure prophylaxis -- although PrEP is probably too recent to have had a substantial effect yet.

    17 July 2015 | HIVandHepatitis.com
  • Sex on premises

    In news that will shock absolutely no-one, gay men and men who have sex with men (MSM) enjoy having sex. Often, we’re not too fussed where – bedrooms, backrooms, bathrooms – so much so that commercial operations exist to provide gay men the opportunity to show up, fuck and leave.

    15 July 2015 | Archer
  • How are drugs changing the way London's gay men have sex?

    An in-depth investigation into the men, meth and mechanics of the city's ‘chemsex’ communities.

    15 July 2015 | Dazed
  • Preventing HIV in the UK heterosexual population

    It is time to think again about which heterosexuals acquire HIV in the UK and how we can best meet their prevention needs.

    13 July 2015 | National AIDS Trust
  • Serosorting in the Age of PrEP

    Josh Kruger writes: In the past, HIV+ and HIV- men often sought partners of the same status. Is it still, or was it ever, necessary? Sometimes, I’ll hear HIV-positive people talk about how the best way they can prevent HIV is to only date or have sex with other HIV-positive people. I can understand this line of thinking; I used to hold the same sentiment. Still, the longer that I live with HIV, and the more advances I see being made in science, I think we need to scrap this idea altogether.

    09 July 2015 | The Advocate
  • The Report: Chemsex

    Crystal Meth, GHB/GBL and Mephedrone are drugs that together can heighten arousal and strip away inhibitions. They've become increasingly popular on London's gay scene, and the effects can see some users taking part in weekend-long sex parties, involving multiple partners. For Radio 4's The Report, Mobeen Azhar speaks to men entrenched in this lifestyle and explores the impact the so-called 'chemsex' scene is having on public health services.

    03 July 2015 | BBC Radio 4
  • New STI figures show rapid increases among gay men

    Annual data for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and national chlamydia screening programme (NCSP) has been released for 2014.

    23 June 2015 | Public Health England press release
  • What makes you think he’ll never cheat?

    Working in HIV prevention, I can no longer count the number of times I’ve heard someone say that they believed that they were in a monogamous relationship only to find out that they weren’t. That’s a harsh wake-up call at the best of times. When accompanied by an HIV diagnosis it is far from the best of times.

    05 June 2015 | GMFA
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