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Emotional wellbeing, mental health and HIV

Emotional wellbeing and mental health are important for everyone. Going through difficult times is part of life, but from time to time these can be especially hard to deal with. Furthermore, some people also experience mental health problems, such as depression or anxiety – where emotions such as being in a low mood, feeling helpless or hopeless about the future, experiencing grief – carry on for some time, or return again and again, and start to interfere with quality of life.

Being diagnosed and living with a serious illness like HIV is likely to have a big emotional impact, and people with HIV, as a group, have higher rates of mental health problems than those seen in the general population.

If you are experiencing emotional difficulties or mental health problems, learning to understand and cope with them is an important part of being able to deal with them.

HIV, mental health & emotional wellbeing

Published December 2014

Last reviewed December 2014

Next review December 2017

Contact NAM to find out more about the scientific research and information used to produce this booklet.

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.