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Activists United and Ignited by Urgency for HIV Prevention in Europe: EATG and AVAC call for the rollout of PrEP as a proven HIV prevention strategy

Initiated and organised entirely by the community of people living with and at risk for HIV, the second European HIV Prevention Summit brought together representatives of civil society, the pharmaceutical industry, researchers and academia in Brussels between 29 and 31 January. In addition to a thorough examination of PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), the summit discussed the latest developments in the research fields of vaccines, rectal and vaginal microbicides and antibodies and their utility in HIV prevention.

Published
03 February 2016
From
EATG
About that latest big Gates Foundation bet for HIV prevention

It isn’t too out of the ordinary for Gates Foundation grant awards to soar into the eight- and even nine-figure range. So, its $20 million grant to Moderna Therapeutics to support its continuing development of a novel but promising HIV prevention therapy isn’t particularly extraordinary. But what is unusual...is that the total potential commitment from the foundation could reach upwards of $100 million—around 70 percent of the Gates Foundation’s HIV/AIDS grants for all of last year.

Published
27 January 2016
From
Inside Philanthropy
A European Alliance dedicated to accelerating new concepts in HIV Vaccine research

The European Commission has granted over 22 million Euros to the European HIV Vaccine Alliance (EHVA) to develop a multidisciplinary platform to evaluate novel preventive and therapeutic vaccines. The grant is supplemented with additional 6 million Euros from the Swiss government for the Swiss project partners.

Published
27 January 2016
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
AIDS pioneer finally brings AIDS vaccine to clinic

Human trials of more than 100 different AIDS vaccines have taken place since researchers proved in 1984 that HIV caused the disease. Robert Gallo, whose U.S. National Cancer Institute laboratory published the four landmark papers in Science that convinced the world of the link between this recently discovered retrovirus and the growing epidemic, has closely monitored—and often sharply critiqued—the AIDS vaccine search since it began. But Gallo, who now runs the Institute of Human Virology (IHV) in Baltimore, Maryland, has always been a spectator—until today.

Published
14 October 2015
From
Science Insider
Investment in post-efficacy R&D critical for PrEP, other new HIV prevention options

HIV Prevention Research & Development Funding Trends 2000–2014: Investment Priorities To Fund Innovation In An Evolving Global Health And Development Landscape is the 11th annual report by the Working Group, a collaboration among AVAC, UNAIDS, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI). The report summarizes investment in HIV prevention research across eight prevention options, as well as HSV-2 vaccine and HIV cure and therapeutic vaccine R&D.

Published
19 July 2015
From
AVAC
Bold goal of stopping HIV is motivating great science

The massive challenge of finding an HIV vaccine has unleashed stunning creativity in laboratories all over the world. While we work toward the long-term goal of a vaccine, we are also pulling in partners from many sectors to improve prevention, treatment, and access to options in the short term.

Published
13 July 2015
From
Devex
J&J vaccine completely prevented HIV in half of monkeys in trial

An experimental Johnson & Johnson vaccine completely prevented HIV infection in half of monkeys that got the shot and then were exposed to high doses of an aggressive virus, results that spurred the company to test the vaccine in people, academic and company researchers said on Thursday.

Published
03 July 2015
From
Reuters
Potential New HIV Therapy Seen in Component of Immune Cells

A research team led by Weill Cornell Medical College scientists has discovered a way to limit replication of the most common form of HIV at a key moment when the infection is just starting to develop. The study, published June 25 in Nature Communications, has shed light on a potential new element of human immunity against HIV-1 and could provide a powerful new strategy — perhaps as part of an HIV vaccine — to limit the severity of the disease.

Published
26 June 2015
From
Weill Cornell Medical College
NIAID-funded HIV vaccine research generates key antibodies in animal models

A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. Each of the research teams received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Published
19 June 2015
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Sequential immunizations could be the key to HIV vaccine

Scientists have thought for some time that multiple immunizations, each tailored to specific stages of the immune response, could be used to generate a special class of HIV-fighting antibodies, so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies. New findings provide the first evidence supporting this approach.

Published
19 June 2015
From
Science Daily
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