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Investment in post-efficacy R&D critical for PrEP, other new HIV prevention options

HIV Prevention Research & Development Funding Trends 2000–2014: Investment Priorities To Fund Innovation In An Evolving Global Health And Development Landscape is the 11th annual report by the Working Group, a collaboration among AVAC, UNAIDS, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI). The report summarizes investment in HIV prevention research across eight prevention options, as well as HSV-2 vaccine and HIV cure and therapeutic vaccine R&D.

Published
19 July 2015
From
AVAC
Bold goal of stopping HIV is motivating great science

The massive challenge of finding an HIV vaccine has unleashed stunning creativity in laboratories all over the world. While we work toward the long-term goal of a vaccine, we are also pulling in partners from many sectors to improve prevention, treatment, and access to options in the short term.

Published
13 July 2015
From
Devex
J&J vaccine completely prevented HIV in half of monkeys in trial

An experimental Johnson & Johnson vaccine completely prevented HIV infection in half of monkeys that got the shot and then were exposed to high doses of an aggressive virus, results that spurred the company to test the vaccine in people, academic and company researchers said on Thursday.

Published
03 July 2015
From
Reuters
Potential New HIV Therapy Seen in Component of Immune Cells

A research team led by Weill Cornell Medical College scientists has discovered a way to limit replication of the most common form of HIV at a key moment when the infection is just starting to develop. The study, published June 25 in Nature Communications, has shed light on a potential new element of human immunity against HIV-1 and could provide a powerful new strategy — perhaps as part of an HIV vaccine — to limit the severity of the disease.

Published
26 June 2015
From
Weill Cornell Medical College
NIAID-funded HIV vaccine research generates key antibodies in animal models

A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. Each of the research teams received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Published
19 June 2015
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Sequential immunizations could be the key to HIV vaccine

Scientists have thought for some time that multiple immunizations, each tailored to specific stages of the immune response, could be used to generate a special class of HIV-fighting antibodies, so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies. New findings provide the first evidence supporting this approach.

Published
19 June 2015
From
Science Daily
French Based Biosantech Reports HIV Vaccine Safe

Researchers from French-based Biosantech Company today reported that the company’s HIV vaccine candidate is not toxic to 48 HIV-positive patients enrolled in a double-blind study taking place in France. The data was presented at the International Conference on Retroviruses and Novel Drugs in suburban Chicago.

Published
17 June 2015
From
PR Web
Some chimpanzees infected with AIDS virus may harbor protective, humanlike gene

When Peter Parham’s postdoc first showed him data suggesting a gene in some wild chimpanzees infected with the AIDS virus closely resembled one that protects humans from HIV, he was skeptical.

Published
29 May 2015
From
Science
HIV immunity: rare gene differences offer hope for treatment

Seven years after the ‘Berlin patient’ was cured of HIV, scientists are looking to natural immunity through genetic variation to create vaccine and gene therapies

Published
12 May 2015
From
The Guardian
Does Llama Blood Hold the Key to an HIV Vaccine?

Previous research suggested that llamas given an experimental HIV vaccine produce virus-fighting antibodies that are smaller than those produced by humans. As a result, these smaller antibodies do a better job of latching onto the receptors in human cells where part of the virus lives. An HIV vaccine should target these receptors.

Published
11 May 2015
From
Healthline
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