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HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected adults

HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.

Published
10 December 2014
From
Science Daily
Leaving it late: why are people still dying from HIV in the UK?

People whose HIV infection is diagnosed late have a ten-fold increased risk of dying within the first year of diagnosis compared to those diagnosed early. And it’s estimated that someone who is diagnosed very late with HIV has a life expectancy at least 10 years shorter than someone who starts treatment earlier.

Published
02 December 2014
From
Public Health England blog
Only three in 10 Americans have HIV under control: government report

Just 30 percent of Americans living with HIV have the virus in check, putting others at risk of infection, U.S. health officials said yesterday. The report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 840,000 of the 1.2 million people infected with HIV in 2011 were not consistently taking anti-HIV drugs that keep the virus suppressed at very low levels.

Published
26 November 2014
From
Reuters
Narrow Time Window Exists to Start HIV Therapy, Study Shows

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Published
25 November 2014
From
Infection Control Today
The genetics of coping with HIV

We respond to infections in two fundamental ways. One is 'resistance,' where the body attacks the invading pathogen and reduces its numbers. Another, which is much less well understood, is 'tolerance,' where the body tries to minimize the damage done by the pathogen. A study using data from a large Swiss cohort of HIV-infected individuals gives us a glimpse into why some people cope with HIV better than others.

Published
12 November 2014
From
Science Daily
Why Did AIDS Activists Go to Geneva to Cite U.S. HIV/AIDS Policies as a Form of Racial Discrimination?

"It is important for activists to use whatever means are at our disposal -- including public embarrassment of the U.S. -- to fight all forms of discrimination," says Kenyon Farrow, the U.S. & Global Health Policy Director with Treatment Action Group (TAG).

Published
29 October 2014
From
The Body
After two years on antiretroviral therapy, survival in South African patients meets rates from North America

Provided that therapy is started promptly, South Africans with HIV have chances of remaining alive beyond two years on antiretroviral therapy that are comparable to those of North American patients, according to new research.

Published
10 September 2014
From
Science Daily
HIV drugs 'boost South African life expectancy'

South Africans are living on average up to 61.2 years compared to 52.2 years nearly 10 years ago, mainly thanks to life-saving Aids drugs, a government report says.

Published
04 August 2014
From
BBC
Lowering toxicity of new HIV drugs predicted to improve life expectancy

While bringing new drugs to market is important for increasing life expectancy in younger people with HIV, lowering the toxicity of those drugs may have an even greater health impact on all HIV patients, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals.

Published
26 June 2014
From
EurekAlert
Mortality with HIV drops sharply in Georgia after 2004 cART rollout

Mortality among Georgians with HIV fell by more than half after 2004, when the Eastern European country began providing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to everyone in need. Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of death.

Published
23 June 2014
From
International AIDS Society
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