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More African Americans still die of HIV than whites and Latinos combined, CDC says

More African Americans still die of HIV than whites and Latinos combined, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday, but the black death rate is generally declining more quickly than it is for those other groups.

Published
09 February 2015
From
Washington Post
An HIV Doctor Tells You If Undetectable Really Is the New Negative

Does being undetectable change the way you talk about your HIV status? Can a person who is undetectable stop worrying about transmitting HIV? Joel Gallant, an HIV doctor at Southwest CARE Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico gives his view.

Published
28 January 2015
From
The Body
Dramatic decline in risk for heart attacks among HIV-positive Kaiser Permanente members

Previously reported increased risk of heart attacks among HIV-positive individuals has been largely reversed in recent years for Kaiser Permanente's California patients, according to a study published in the current online issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. The adjusted risk ratio for heart attacks among HIV-positive study participants went from an 80 percent increased risk in 1996 to no increased risk in 2010-2011. Reported first on Aidsmap at http://www.aidsmap.com/Heart-attack-risk-in-people-with-HIV-may-be-falling-but-not-in-women/page/2834402/ .

Published
19 January 2015
From
Eurekalert
HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected adults

HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.

Published
10 December 2014
From
Science Daily
Leaving it late: why are people still dying from HIV in the UK?

People whose HIV infection is diagnosed late have a ten-fold increased risk of dying within the first year of diagnosis compared to those diagnosed early. And it’s estimated that someone who is diagnosed very late with HIV has a life expectancy at least 10 years shorter than someone who starts treatment earlier.

Published
02 December 2014
From
Public Health England blog
Only three in 10 Americans have HIV under control: government report

Just 30 percent of Americans living with HIV have the virus in check, putting others at risk of infection, U.S. health officials said yesterday. The report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 840,000 of the 1.2 million people infected with HIV in 2011 were not consistently taking anti-HIV drugs that keep the virus suppressed at very low levels.

Published
26 November 2014
From
Reuters
Narrow Time Window Exists to Start HIV Therapy, Study Shows

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Published
25 November 2014
From
Infection Control Today
The genetics of coping with HIV

We respond to infections in two fundamental ways. One is 'resistance,' where the body attacks the invading pathogen and reduces its numbers. Another, which is much less well understood, is 'tolerance,' where the body tries to minimize the damage done by the pathogen. A study using data from a large Swiss cohort of HIV-infected individuals gives us a glimpse into why some people cope with HIV better than others.

Published
12 November 2014
From
Science Daily
Why Did AIDS Activists Go to Geneva to Cite U.S. HIV/AIDS Policies as a Form of Racial Discrimination?

"It is important for activists to use whatever means are at our disposal -- including public embarrassment of the U.S. -- to fight all forms of discrimination," says Kenyon Farrow, the U.S. & Global Health Policy Director with Treatment Action Group (TAG).

Published
29 October 2014
From
The Body
After two years on antiretroviral therapy, survival in South African patients meets rates from North America

Provided that therapy is started promptly, South Africans with HIV have chances of remaining alive beyond two years on antiretroviral therapy that are comparable to those of North American patients, according to new research.

Published
10 September 2014
From
Science Daily
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