Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Changing treatment news

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Merck’s HIV Therapy DELSTRIGO™ (doravirine / lamivudine / tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) Meets Primary Efficacy Endpoint in Phase 3 DRIVE-SHIFT Study Evaluating Switch to DELSTRIGO from Other Antiretroviral Treatment Regimens

The study met its primary endpoint of non-inferior efficacy as measured by the proportion of participants who switched to DELSTRIGO and had plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <50 copies/mL at Week 48 compared to the proportion of participants who continued on their baseline regimen and had HIV-1 RNA levels <50 copies/mL at Week 24.

Published
05 October 2018
From
Merck press release
Janssen Reports Switching to SYMTUZA™ Results in Maintained High Virologic Suppression and No Resistance Development up to 96-Weeks in Virologically Suppressed Adults with HIV-1

Results from the pivotal Phase 3 EMERALD study demonstrate that in adults with HIV-1 who are virologically suppressed, switching to SYMTUZA™ resulted in maintained high virologic suppression (91%, 692/763) and low virologic failure (1%, 9/763) at week 96 (per FDA-Snapshot); low cumulative virologic rebound (3.1%, 24/763); and no resistance development, up to 96-weeks.

Published
05 October 2018
From
Janssen press release
What you need to know about HIV two-drug regimens

Integrase inhibitors—potent antiretrovirals that quickly and powerfully suppress HIV—have allowed HIV researchers and clinicians to explore dosing regimens that involve fewer than three or four drugs. Proponents of dual therapy say that effective regimens involving fewer drugs will lower costs, decrease pill burden and reduce the potential for drug-drug interactions and side effects. But is it that simple?

Published
28 August 2018
From
BETA blog
Meta-analysis of dolutegravir in naive, experienced and switch studies

A meta-analysis of 7340 participants in 13 randomised trials found efficacy and safety benefits for starting dolutegravir compared with other antiretrovirals in both naive and experienced participants. In the four switch studies in participants with undetectable viral load on their current ART, however, changing to dolutegravir was associated with more adverse events and discontinuations.

Published
30 April 2018
From
HIV i-Base
HIV Regimen Switch May Contribute to Weight Gain

According to results of a study presented at IDWeek 2017, an increase in body weight is common in HIV patients who are switched from efavirenz/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (EFV/TDF/FTC) to an integrase strand transfer inhibitor.

Published
09 October 2017
From
Monthly Prescribing Reference
Terrence Higgins Trust and BHIVA advise on the use of generic HIV antiretroviral therapy

We believe that people living with HIV should be at the heart of decisions made about their care. Therefore decisions around switching to generic HIV medication should be based on a full discussion between a person living with HIV and their HIV clinician.

Published
16 August 2017
From
Terrence Higgins Trust
HIV: A therapeutic advance for resource-limited settings

ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP, a clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa, shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. Such treatment deescalation will reduce costs, side effects, and the need for virological monitoring of patients. The results of this study are published in The Lancet HIV.

Published
31 May 2017
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
GlaxoSmithKline’s New Drug Challenges HIV Treatment Orthodoxy

GlaxoSmithKline PLC’s ViiV Healthcare announced positive phase-three trial results for its new HIV drug in a dual-drug regimen, supporting the company’s audacious bet that it can shift the treatment orthodoxy away from three-drug combinations.

Published
20 December 2016
From
Wall Street Journal
Ask A Pharmacist: With a new tenofovir, should you switch to Descovy, Genvoya or Odefsey?

I’ve heard more than a few patients ask, what should I do? If I’m already taking Complera, Stribild or Truvada, should I switch to the newer drug formulation with tenofovir alafenamide (TAF)?

Published
20 September 2016
From
BETA blog
Frontier Biotech's Long-acting HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor Albuvirtide Meets 48-Week Primary Objective: Interim Results of a Phase 3 Trial

Frontier Biotechnologies Inc. today reported that a phase 3 clinical trial (TALENT Study) of its lead product albuvirtide meets primary objective based on an interim analysis. The results demonstrated that once-weekly given albuvirtide plus ritonavir-boosted lopinavir was non-inferior to WHO-recommended second-line three-drug regimen (control) at 48-week in treatment experienced HIV-1 infected adults. In addition, patients administered with albuvirtide showed statistically better renal safety than those taking the control regimen containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

Published
07 June 2016
From
Frontier Biotech press release
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.