Taking two or more different drugs together may result in an alteration in the effectiveness or in the side-effects of one or more of the drugs. Pharmacokinetics (PK) is the study of how a drug is absorbed into the body and distributed in different parts of the body. Pharmacodynamics (PD) is the study of the impact of different concentrations of a drug on the body.

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Drug interactions and pharmacokinetics news selected from other sources

  • Many people take drugs that interfere with their blood pressure pills

    People who take pills to lower their blood pressure often take other drugs that reduce the pills’ effectiveness, a recent study suggests.

    22 August 2018 | Reuters
  • Darunavir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1

    New pharmacokinetic data show mean exposure of darunavir (brand name Prezista) boosted with cobicistat (available in combination in Rezolsta, Symtuza) to be lower during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy than during 6–12 weeks postpartum. Low darunavir exposure may be associated with an increased risk of treatment failure and an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission to the unborn child.

    18 July 2018 | MHRA
  • Closer Monitoring Recommended for Older Patients Treated With Dolutegravir for HIV

    The maximum concentration of the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) was significantly higher in people living with HIV who are more than 60 years old compared with younger individuals, according to new findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.There have been recent concerns about DTG-related neuropsychiatric toxicity, especially among older patients with HIV.

    11 June 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • FDA says Prezcobix should not be given to pregnant women

    Darunavir/cobicistat — marketed as Prezcobix (Janssen) in the United States — should not be given to pregnant women with HIV because of substantially lower exposures of the two medications during pregnancy, the FDA said. The agency updated the label for the once-daily, fixed-dose tablet to reflect the change, which it said was based on data from a small clinical trial involving pregnant women.

    11 June 2018 | Healio (requires free registration)
  • Differing drug distribution in penis and rectum of men taking TDF/FTC PrEP

    Men using tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) had detectable drug levels in the urethra more often than on the glans penis, according to results of an 18-man study. FTC concentrations proved similar on urethral and rectal swabs, but tenofovir (TFV) levels were lower on urethral specimens than on rectal swabs.

    25 May 2018 | NATAP
  • How Well Do Docs Manage Potential Conflicts Between Hep C and HIV Meds?

    A recent study of Dutch clinicians found that they generally did a good job of preventing drug-drug interactions.

    10 April 2018 | Poz
  • Dolutegravir and Rifapentine study stopped due to serious toxicities

    A study examining pharmacokinetic interactions between the first-line HIV drug dolutegravir and a once-weekly tuberculosis regimen was terminated early after NIH researchers found that the combined use of the treatments led to “unexpected and serious toxicities” in healthy participants.

    01 March 2018 | Medical Brief
  • Taking multiple Rx drugs raises risks for aging adults with and without HIV

    Taking five or more prescription medications increases the risk of hospitalization and death in older adults infected with HIV and comparable adults without HIV. The findings of this Yale-led study highlight the potential risks of prescribing additional drugs to patients with multiple medical conditions.

    01 February 2018 | Yale News
  • Drug interaction concerns may negatively affect HIV treatment adherence among transgender women

    Participants in NIH-supported study apprehensive about combining HIV medications and hormones.

    25 July 2017 | NIAID
  • Taking Birth Control With HIV Treatment or PrEP Is Largely OK

    Women taking various forms of hormonal contraceptives can likely combine them safely with antiretrovirals (ARVs), whether as HIV treatment or in the form of Truvada (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine) as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against the virus. The one ARV that may be problematic to combine with such forms of birth control is Sustiva (efavirenz), which is included in Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine).

    30 May 2017 | Poz
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