Back to contents

Dietitians

You can get advice on nutrition from a specially trained health professional called a dietitian. Some HIV clinics have specialist dietitians or can refer you to them. Dietitians working with people living with HIV must be trained to achieve a high level of competencies as set down by the British HIV Association.

Dietitians can:

  • Make sure your diet is fulfilling all your individual nutritional requirements.
  • Give you advice about your diet if you are experiencing metabolic changes due to your HIV treatment.
  • Regularly check your body weight and ensure that the proportion of fat to muscle is appropriate.
  • Advise you on any dietary changes you may need to make if you become ill.
  • Help you avoid food poisoning.
  • Offer advice on symptom control, such as how to manage changes in taste caused by medication.
  • Give advice for managing conditions such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia (high levels of fat in the blood) and poor absorption of food.
  • Give advice on your nutritional requirements during pregnancy.
  • Help you identify and manage any food allergies and intolerances.
  • Advise you on your nutrition needs based on your exercise levels or sporting activity.
  • Provide information and advice on the use of vitamins and minerals and complementary therapies.

Some dietitians use a variety of tests to assess how much muscle and fat there is in your body. If these tests are done regularly your dietitian may be able to spot changes in weight and body composition before you do. However, you may be the first to notice changes in your weight or body shape – for instance, if your clothes become too loose or tight. These may be important times to talk to your dietitian about making changes to your diet or exercise.

Nutrition

Published August 2016

Last reviewed August 2016

Next review August 2019

Contact NAM to find out more about the scientific research and information used to produce this booklet.

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.