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  • Namibia: Kids Eat ARVs Discarded By HIV Patients

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drugs that are randomly discarded are becoming a regular occurrence in the informal settlements and a cause for concern, because small children pick the pills up and chew on them. Community activist Anna Mooya believes people on treatment are throwing away their drugs, because they do not have enough food to eat. "Some complain of hunger, that their faces swell up [when they take the medication], they feel dizzy and sometimes get stressed out. They do face a lot of challenges," she said.

    19 August 2015 | AllAfrica.com
  • Simple but elusive – why are we still talking about HIV drug delivery?

    Helen Bygrave of MSF discusses her frustrations with the lack of implementation of simple, programmatic strategies for improving HIV care.

    21 July 2015 | PLOS Blogs
  • IAS 2015: While “game-changing,” START trial draws “line in the sand” and sets “time a’ ticking” to stop preventable illnesses and death, calls for action are accompanied by questions of impact of inequities, obstacles

    Study also showed that most commonly used measure — CD4 count does not give accurate projection of illness risk.

    21 July 2015 | Science Speaks
  • People with HIV live almost 20 years longer than in 2001

    People living with the HIV virus today can expect to live nearly two decades longer than those who were diagnosed at the start of this century, thanks to cheaper and more readily available antiretroviral drugs, the UN said in a major report on a disease once seen by many as a death sentence to be endured in secrecy. The average HIV-positive person is now expected to live for 55 years – 19 years longer than in 2001, according to the report by the UN’s Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAids).

    14 July 2015 | The Guardian
  • Scientists have the tools to end the HIV epidemic; they just need better ways to use them

    In the past, there was a sense that stopping the HIV/AIDS epidemic would require some radically new biomedical intervention, such as a cure or a vaccine. The growing consensus, however, is that the tools needed to stamp out HIV already exist if they could just be used in the right way.

    08 July 2015 | Nature
  • Meet the Khayelitsha compliers club

    Communities are bringing HIV monitoring and dispensing out of the clinics and into their homes.

    06 July 2015 | Mail & Guardian
  • When to START has never been clearer

    Posirtive Lite editor Bob Leahy in conversation with CATIE’s Sean Hosein about START, the important and ground-breaking study that recently provided definitive evidence of the health benefits of starting HIV treatment sooner rather than later.

    10 June 2015 | Positive Lite
  • Uganda: women and girls bear burden of HIV caregiving

    James Odong explores how the burden of caregiving falls heavily on girls, affecting their quality of life and education opportunities, as well as bringing added vulnerabilities.

    07 April 2015 | Key Correspondents
  • UNAIDS holds virtual consultation for its 2016–2021 Strategy

    UNAIDS is holding its first round of virtual consultations to develop its 2016–2021 Strategy. From 23 March to 2 April, the consultation process will be open to everyone to share information, ideas and experiences on how to accelerate rights-based, evidence-informed action to Fast-Track the AIDS response.

    26 March 2015 | UNAIDS
  • NIH-led study to assess community-based hepatitis C treatment in Washington, D.C.

    Officials from NIH and the city of Washington, D.C., launched a clinical trial to examine whether primary care physicians and other health care providers, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, can use a new antiviral therapy as effectively as specialist physicians to treat people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The trial, which will involve 600 adult D.C. residents infected with HCV alone or co-infected with HCV and HIV, also will examine the long-term effects of the treatment.

    09 March 2015 | EurekAlert
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