Confidentiality, consent and medical ethics: latest news

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Confidentiality, consent and medical ethics features

Confidentiality, consent and medical ethics news from aidsmap

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  • Porn Actors' Medical Files Are Targets of AHF Subpoenas

    The AIDS Healthcare Foundation is asking sexual health testing centers for medical files of adult film actors.

    25 August 2015 | Poz magazine news
  • Top five concerns people with HIV have about ageing: Scotland

    Through the Positive Persons' Forum and other initiatives, many people with HIV in Scotland have made it clear that they are very concerned about growing older with HIV. We have set out some of these concerns in the infographic below (or view it as a plain online image). The top 5 concerns were confidentiality, the effects of HIV medication, drug interactions, Financial stability and ignorance and stigma.

    12 August 2015 | HIV Scotland-
  • Risks vs rewards: why people with HIV volunteer for 'cure' research

    A recent survey of people living with HIV in the United Kingdom found that more than half would participate in a clinical study to develop a cure for HIV, despite this posing a risk to their health. Why would someone choose to do this?

    24 June 2015 | The Conversation
  • Kenya HIV activists want data destroyed

    Human rights activists have gone to court to get Kenya's government to destroy data which lists children who are HIV positive.

    19 June 2015 | BBC
  • When to START has never been clearer

    Posirtive Lite editor Bob Leahy in conversation with CATIE’s Sean Hosein about START, the important and ground-breaking study that recently provided definitive evidence of the health benefits of starting HIV treatment sooner rather than later.

    10 June 2015 | Positive Lite
  • Maligned Study on Gay Unions Is Shaking Trust

    In 2012, as same-sex marriage advocates were working to build support in California, Michael LaCour, a political science researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, asked a critical question: Can canvassers with a personal stake in an issue — in this case, gay men and women — actually sway voters’ opinions in a lasting way? Last week, their finding that gay canvassers were in fact powerfully persuasive with people who had voted against same-sex marriage — published in December in Science, one of the world’s leading scientific journals — collapsed amid accusations that Mr. LaCour had misrepresented his study methods and lacked the evidence to back up his findings.

    26 May 2015 | New York Times
  • Publishing HIV sufferers’ identities not permitted, says Greek committee

    The government on Tuesday officially repealed a controversial legal provision that was issued three years ago “to curb the spread of infectious diseases” but was widely condemned for stigmatizing women with HIV, particularly prostitutes, as it allowed their details to be made public.

    27 April 2015 | Kathimerini
  • Policy of Mandatory HIV Testing of Sex Workers Repealed in Greece

    According to a report at Human Rights Watch (HRW), Greek Prime Minister, Alexis Tsipras, on the 2nd of April, repealed the health regulation used to justify roundups and forced HIV testing of people alleged to be sex workers.

    15 April 2015 | Global Network of Sex Work Projects
  • Czech human rights advocates up in arms over proposal to make HIV testing compulsory for high-risk groups

    The Czech Health Ministry is pushing a proposed amendment to the law on public health which would make HIV testing compulsory for some people in high risk groups. While the ministry argues that this is to curb the spread of the disease and ensure early treatment, human rights advocates say it would mean a serious breach of human rights.

    09 April 2015 | Radio Prague
  • Failed Trial in Africa Raises Questions About How to Test HIV Drugs

    The failure of the VOICE trial of H.I.V.-prevention methods in Africa — and the elaborate deceptions employed by the women in it — have opened an ethical debate about how to run such studies in poor countries and have already changed the design of some that are now underway.

    05 February 2015 | New York Times
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