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    At the age of four or five your child will start going to school. This is initially an unsettling experience for a lot of children,...

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  • Risk of birth defects small with HIV drugs

    The risks of birth defects in children exposed to antiretroviral drugs in utero are small when considering the clear benefit of preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV but where there are safe and effective alternatives, it might be appropriate to avoid use by pregnant women of drugs that may be associated with elevated risks of birth defects, such as zidovudine and efavirenz, according to a study published by French researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine.

    30 April 2014 | EurekAlert
  • HIV Drug Linked to Low Bone Density in Babies

    In a cohort study, babies of mothers taking tenofovir (Viread) had an average whole-body bone mineral content about 8 grams less than babies whose mothers did not use the drug, according to George Siberry, MD, of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Md

    07 March 2014 | MedPage Today
  • Intrauterine, postnatal growth unaffected by exposure to HIV, antenatal antiretrovirals

    Exposure to HIV and antenatal antiretrovirals did not significantly affect infants’ intrauterine or early postnatal growth, according to study results published in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

    08 January 2014 | Healio
  • Improved caregiver training helps HIV-infected children

    Children born with HIV can live longer and richer lives if their caregivers receive training in ways to enhance the children’s development, according to research led by Michigan State University.

    15 August 2013 | Michigan State University (press release)
  • Anti-HIV drugs may protect against puberty delays in HIV-infected children

    For children who have been HIV-infected since birth, current anti-HIV drug regimens may protect against the delays in puberty that had been seen in HIV-infected children taking older regimens, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.

    15 August 2013 | National Institutes of Health (press release)
  • Anti-HIV drugs in pregnancy not linked to children's language delays

    The combinations of anti-HIV drugs recommended for pregnant women do not appear in general to increase their children's risk for language delay, according to a study from a National Institutes of Health research network.

    19 July 2013 | National Institutes of Health (press release)
  • Maternal abacavir, smoking tied to heart markers in HIV-exposed kids

    HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children of HIV-positive mothers who took abacavir, smoked, or drank alcohol had elevated levels of cardiac biomarkers that could signal heart trouble, according to analysis of the US Pediatric HIVAIDS Cohort Study (PHACS). The study also linked cardiac biomarkers to some echocardiographic abnormalities.

    07 May 2013 | International AIDS Society
  • Anti-HIV therapy appears to protect children's hearts, NIH network study shows

    For children who have had HIV-1 infection since birth, the combination drug therapies now used to treat HIV appear to protect against the heart damage seen before combination therapies were available, according to researchers.

    23 April 2013 | National Institutes of Health (press release)
  • HIV Drug Not Tied to Premature Births

    Pregnant HIV-infected women treated with a lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra)-based antiretroviral regimen are at no greater risk of delivering a preterm baby than similar pregnant women given an efavirenz (Sustiva)-based treatment, researchers said here.

    10 March 2013 | MedPage Today
  • Texas: Food availability linked with poor outcomes for HIV-positive children

    An HIV-positive child whose family does not have enough good food available is more likely to have a poor clinical outcome, researchers reported. They found that children who did not always have enough to eat had lower CD4 counts as well as higher chances of incomplete viral suppression.

    12 February 2013 | Baylor College of Medicine press release
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