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  • CDC Launches HIV Treatment Awareness Campaign

    “HIV Treatment Works” is a new awareness campaign from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    17 September 2014 | Poz
  • Houston we have an HIV PR problem

    The most important group who should hear about treatment as prevention, undetectability, sero-sorting and all the other non-condom options, are those who have successfully avoided HIV thus far and are reluctant to get tested. In other words the vast majority of the LGBT population, because they are the ones who are getting the wrong end of the stick when they hear snippets of information about HIV.

    17 September 2014 | Positive Lite
  • Are "Sugar Daddies" to Blame for HIV Transmission in Africa?

    It was long assumed that a major driver of the vastly greater prevalence of HIV infection in Zimbabwe, South Africa and other epicenters of the African HIV epidemic is intergeneratioal sex - sepcifically, young women having sexual realtionships with older "sugar daddies". Contrary to expectations, a recent high-quality, longitudinal study showed that participation in intergenerational sex did not impact the likelihood of contracting HIV infection.

    05 September 2014 | Scientific American
  • Telling tales and talking-through

    There has been a recent wave of films and television events, for a combined gay and heterosexual audience, in an emerging genre of “AIDS nostalgia”. I’m thinking of films like Dallas Buyers’ Club and television series like Angels in America and The Normal Heart.

    01 September 2014 | Bad Blood (blog)
  • In treatment as prevention era, health communication plays new and critical role

    When biomedical answers have supplanted behavior change messages as the most promising measures of preventing HIV transmission, what is the role of health communication in confronting the epidemic now?

    18 July 2014 | Science Speaks
  • The Failure of the ABC Approach to HIV Prevention

    For close to 25 years the standard HIV prevention strategy was the ABC sexual behaviour change strategy: Abstain, be Faithful, and use Condoms. Today, this ‘old’ strategy has all but faded into the background, with only condoms remaining on the tick-list of ‘to do’s’. The evidence was clear: New infections continued to rise steadily year after year, regardless of ABC. The 2012 South African Department of Health Antenatal Study confirms this.

    08 July 2014 | Communications Initiative
  • HIV Experts Look To Video Games, Chat Rooms, And Social Media To Help Promote Prevention

    A study out of Columbia University School of Nursing has revealed that HIV prevention tips spread through video games, text messages, chat rooms, and social media have been linked to less risky sexual behavior and more HIV testing among gay and bisexual men.

    25 June 2014 | Medical Daily
  • New videos combat HIV stigma with human stories

    A BRAND new series of videos that aims to break down the stigma surrounding HIV has just been released by HIV Foundation Queensland.

    18 June 2014 | Sydney Star Observer
  • Condomless Sex and Gay Men

    Perhaps the alarming reaction to PrEP is not surprising. Our culture has always had harsh words for gay men, women, or anyone who wasn’t a heterosexual man who exhibited and acted upon strong sexual appetites outside of traditional marriage.

    06 June 2014 | Psychology Today
  • CDC Launches New Campaign - "Start Talking. Stop HIV." - for Gay and Bisexual Men

    The campaign encourages gay and bisexual men to talk to their sexual partners about HIV testing, HIV status, condoms, PrEP, PEP and antiretroviral therapy.

    22 May 2014 | AIDS.gov
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