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  • London HIV Prevention Programme media contracts announced

    Contracts have been awarded to a group of specialist media agencies (Team Enter, Manning Gottlieb, Carat) as part of the new London HIV Prevention Programme (LHPP) funded by London boroughs.

    21 January 2015 | London Councils
  • The Quest Workshop for Black and Minority Ethnic Gay and Bisexual Men

    Public Health England (PHE) has commissioned The Quest to deliver its flagship “The Quest Workshop”, aimed at reducing health risk behaviour and building resilience, to Black African, Black Caribbean, mixed Black and other ethnicity (BME) gay and bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM). As part of the project, The Quest will be delivering two workshops in London and one in Manchester. The first set of workshops will be taking place in March 2015.

    21 January 2015 | The Quest
  • Fighting Poverty and HIV With Soap Operas

    TV can have an impact on poverty and public health, changing social behaviors.

    16 January 2015 | Businessweek
  • Uganda: HIV rights groups attack Museveni

    A coalition of civil society organisations on the frontline of Uganda’s HIV response yesterday demanded President Museveni to withdrawal his remarks on HIV/Aids prevention. The President had said: “Those NGOs and whites come deceiving you that circumcision and condom use are the best ways to protect yourself against HIV/Aids. But I advise you to put padlocks on your private parts.”

    08 December 2014 | Daily Monitor
  • The New Face of HIV Is Gay & Young

    Infection rates among young gay men are on the rise—and veterans of the fight against AIDS are struggling to find a way to get the message out to the next generation.

    03 December 2014 | Daily Beast
  • Demand creation for voluntary medical male circumcision: how can we influence emotional choices?

    Governments and others employ two main approaches, informed by acceptability studies, for increasing the demand for VMMC—behaviour change communication (BCC) and opportunity or transaction cost reduction. The results from these approaches have been disappointing.

    01 December 2014 | 3ie
  • We Are Positive

    Positively UK's new film raising awareness of HIV, challenging preconceptions and tackling stigma.

    28 November 2014 | Positively UK (video)
  • Rupert Whitaker: A pill for risky sex—another step on the road to a pill for bad housing

    The primary problem with PrEP is that, firstly, just as with HIV medications and condoms, it would not necessarily be delivered as part of adequate services in the clinic and, secondly, we don’t always use them properly, sometimes for very good reasons. In real life, physicians won’t always be compliant with guidelines that require PrEP to be prescribed as part of even a minimal programme of behavioural health, and this will increase the risk of problems that are already well evidenced with both PrEP and HIV treatment, such as non-adherence and disengagement from services.

    08 November 2014 | BMJ Group Blogs
  • Learning, Dating and Hooking Up: Sex Education Goes Online in Cambodia

    The transition to puberty can be an awkward experience for youth to navigate. In Cambodia, sex education is moving increasingly into the virtual realm, with the Internet and mobile phones providing welcome spaces for young people to learn, seek help and stay safe.

    07 November 2014 | Inter Press Service
  • Phone apps could help promote sexual health in MSM

    Public health experts hope smartphone apps that men who have sex with men use to meet sexual partners might help in health promotion.

    17 October 2014 | The Lancet
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