Ageing and HIV: latest news

Ageing and HIV resources

  • Side-effects checker

    A tool to help you talk to your healthcare team about any side-effects or symptoms that you have....

    From: Resources

  • Cognitive impairment and HIV

    Problems with thinking and memory can have a wide range of causes.A healthy lifestyle lowers the risk of cognitive impairment in later life.Cognitive impairment caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bone problems and HIV

    When your bones are thinner, a trip or fall can result in a broken bone. Exercise and other lifestyle changes are good for your bones. People aged 50+ and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Menopause and HIV

    The menopause is a natural part of each woman’s ageing process. Knowing what symptoms to expect during the menopause can help you deal with the experience. Hormone replacement therapy...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health monitoring in older age

    As we age, the risks of developing certain health problems increase. Some common conditions associated with being older (generally being over 50) include type 2 diabetes, heart disease...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Chronic kidney disease and HIV

    HIV may contribute to kidney disease but the two most common causes are diabetes and high blood pressure.Lifestyle changes can help keep kidney disease under control.Your HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Type 2 diabetes and HIV

    Changes to your lifestyle can reduce your risk of diabetes.Diabetes requires frequent monitoring and can have serious consequences if left untreated. Rates of diabetes are higher in people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and HIV

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a cancer affecting the immune system. People with weakened immune systems, including people with HIV, are at increased risk of developing NHL. Most people with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Stroke and HIV

    A stroke is a medical emergency that requires prompt treatment. High blood pressure and raised cholesterol are risk factors for stroke. A healthy diet, regular exercise, stopping smoking, and other...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment, metabolic changes and ageing

    Smoking, lack of exercise, eating a lot of fatty foods and drinking a lot of alcohol can cause changes to blood fats and to the way your...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Conditions related to HIV treatment, metabolic changes and ageing

    Lipodystrophy is a condition which causes changes in body shape and involves fat loss or fat gain in certain parts of the body. Long-term use of some older anti-HIV...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • GPs and primary care

    Many GPs offer services which are not available at your HIV clinic.To access a GP you must be registered as their patient.You don't have to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2

Ageing and HIV features

Ageing and HIV in your own words

Ageing and HIV news from aidsmap

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Ageing and HIV news selected from other sources

  • ‘Fathers’ Explores a World Where AIDS Never Killed Our Queer Forbearers (Video)

    Gay Mexican director Leo Herrera is directing Fathers (aka. The Fathers Project), a sci-fi documentary that explores how society might be different if the AIDS epidemic had never happened. The film mixes real life and fantasy with a cast and crew including historians, artists and performers who imagine the cultural and political influence that we could have had had our “fathers” (the queer men who proceeded us) had not become part of a lost generation.

    21 June 2017 | Unicorn Booty
  • Is life for long-term HIV survivors far worse than we want to admit?

    In my interview with Sean, we wrangle over our different styles, the purpose of AIDS history, whether fear is a useful tool, and his insistence that life today for long-term survivors is far worse than any of us are acknowledging.

    06 June 2017 | Queerty
  • Honoring the Experience of Long-Term Survivors of HIV/AIDS

    On HIV Long-Term Survivors Day, Kelsey Louie of Gay Men's Health Crisis describes how we can help these fierce warriors through new challenges.

    06 June 2017 | The Advocate
  • New Study Reveals why people with HIV are more likely to develop Emphysema

    Up to 30 percent of HIV patients who are appropriately treated with antiretroviral therapies develop the chronic lung disease emphysema in their lifetime. Now, new research from Weill Cornell Medicine investigators has uncovered a mechanism that might explain why this lung damage occurs.

    10 May 2017 | Weill Cornell Medicine
  • A Second Chance at Death

    Long-term survivors, as haunted as we may be by our past, are uniquely qualified to address the practical and emotional concerns of our own mortality. I have arrangements for my living will, instructions not to resuscitate, and know my way around end-of-life care. Moreover, I am already in the practice of telling my friends how much I love them.

    02 May 2017 | My Fabulous Disease
  • Pretreatment HIV, immune activation levels determine their persistence during treatment

    A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds that pretreatment levels of HIV and immune activation appear to determine the extent to which viral levels and inflammation persist during antiretroviral treatment.

    25 April 2017 | Eurekalert Inf Dis
  • Are serious heart problems inevitable for people with HIV? A conversation with cardiologist Priscilla Hsue

    Priscilla Hsue, MD, FACC, a cardiologist at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital spoke about heart health and inflammation, and why cardiovascular conditions are becoming a growing concern for people growing older with HIV.

    16 March 2017 | BETA blog
  • Minority Within A Minority: Women Ageing With HIV

    My research is a three year project, exploring what it is like to be an older women with HIV, how the social and physical experiences of ageing are affected by HIV, and what support exists or is needed to enable older women living with HIV to age well.

    09 March 2017 | Huffington Post
  • HCV Infection Linked to Nonhepatic Cancers in the Elderly

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be linked to cancers other than hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), such as bile duct cancers and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), according to a study published in Cancer.

    21 February 2017 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • UK’s first LGBT older person’s community planned for Manchester

    The ambition to create a community aimed at older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people has been announced today by Manchester City Council.

    19 February 2017 | Manchester City Council
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.