Ageing and HIV: latest news

Ageing and HIV resources

  • Health monitoring in older age

    As we age, the risks of developing certain health problems increase. Some common conditions associated with being older (generally being over 50) include type 2 diabetes, heart disease...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Stroke

    A stroke happens when a blood clot blocks an artery or blood vessel in the brain, or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diabetes

    Diabetes is a condition where the amount of glucose in the body is too high because the body cannot use it properly. Diabetes exists in two...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Older adults

    The existence of effective treatments for HIV means people are able to live with HIV to an increasingly older age. The proportion of people seen for HIV...

    From: HIV & UK African communities

    Information level Level 4

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Ageing and HIV news selected from other sources

  • The Low-Down on Inflammation from an HIV Doctor

    Inflammation is the generic term for the body’s response to injury. During injury, the immune system—our body’s defense system—activates a complicated network of cells and chemical signals. Acute inflammation, immune activation that’s rapid and self-limited, is essential for healing. But chronic inflammation, immune activation that continues even after the initial injury is gone, is problematic. Chronic inflammation is like a volume control knob on a stereo being stuck—with the volume turned all the way up.

    24 August 2015 | BETA blog
  • Top five concerns people with HIV have about ageing: Scotland

    Through the Positive Persons' Forum and other initiatives, many people with HIV in Scotland have made it clear that they are very concerned about growing older with HIV. We have set out some of these concerns in the infographic below (or view it as a plain online image). The top 5 concerns were confidentiality, the effects of HIV medication, drug interactions, Financial stability and ignorance and stigma.

    12 August 2015 | HIV Scotland-
  • Patients with AIDS at increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome have a four-fold increase in their risk of developing intermediate-stage age-related macular degeneration compared to people of the same age who are not infected with HIV, according to results from the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS presented today at the 2015 ARVO Annual Meeting in Denver, Colo.

    05 May 2015 | Eurekalert Medicine & Health
  • UCLA research links HIV to age-accelerating cellular changes

    Study suggests adults infected with the virus can develop age-related diseases a decade earlier than their uninfected peers.

    23 April 2015 | UCLA press release
  • Age-related macular degeneration in HIV

    Researchers at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City and elsewhere in the U.S. have been monitoring the eyes of people who have survived AIDS. They found that out of 1,825 participants, 10% had intermediate-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Compared to HIV-negative people, the rate of AMD among these long-term survivors of AIDS was four-fold greater. The findings and implications of this study are discussed below.

    01 April 2015 | CATIE
  • Predictors of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy in the modern era

    Researchers at major clinical centres in the U.S. have collaborated to study potential causes of peripheral neuropathy (PN) among HIV-positive people in the modern era. They recruited about 500 people who were free from PN and monitored them for an average of two years, performing extensive assessments. Taking into account many issues, statistical analysis found that there were several factors associated with an increased risk for PN.

    01 April 2015 | CATIE
  • Researchers Delve Into HIV-Infected Population's Aging Risks

    Faced with an aging HIV-infected population, international researchers are trying to understand whether the virus or the medications that treat it may accelerate aging. As the life expectancy of those with HIV has increased dramatically since the 1990s because of better medicine, so too has the risk of other chronic diseases typically associated with age, like diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis and cognitive decline.

    15 January 2015 | Wall Street Journal
  • Could HIV make hearing worse?

    A new study has found that low- and high-frequency hearing is poorer in adults with the human immunodeficiency virus, compared with adults who do not have the disease. Although unexpected, similar hearing loss has previously been observed to be more likely in adults with diabetes mellitus. "It is possible that both HIV infection and diabetes, being systemic diseases, could affect the neural function of the cochlea," the authors suggest.

    29 December 2014 | Medical News Today
  • HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected adults

    HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.

    10 December 2014 | Science Daily
  • HIV/AIDS drugs could be repurposed to treat AMD, researchers suggest

    Drugs that have been used for the past 30 years to treat HIV/AIDS, could be repurposed to treat the dry form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a new study suggests. AMD is a progressive condition that is untreatable in up to 90 percent of patients and is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. The two forms of AMD, wet and dry, are classified based on the presence or absence of blood vessels that have invaded the retina.

    21 November 2014 | Science Daily
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