Adherence: latest news

Adherence resources

  • Why taking your HIV treatment properly is so important

    The currently available anti-HIV drugs cannot cure HIV. However, treatment with a combination of these drugs (usually three) can reduce the amount of HIV in your blood (your...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • What does taking your HIV treatment involve?

    Taking your drugs as prescribed is often called ‘adherence’. Adherence to your HIV treatment means: Taking all the medicines that make up your...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Factors that can affect adherence

    Medicines from the three main classes of anti-HIV drugs (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or NRTIs; non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or NNRTIs; and protease inhibitors) are available in forms...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Taking your HIV treatment

    This booklet is a starting point for anyone who wants to know about treatment for HIV. It provides basic information about how HIV treatment works...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Taking your treatment – adherence

    Taking your treatment properly is key to its success. More information and help on this can be found here....

    From: Living with HIV

    Information level Level 2
  • Adherence

    Adherence is the term that is used to describe taking your medicines properly. You'll get the most benefit from your medicines if you take them properly. Taking your HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Adherence tips

    You need to take your HIV treatment properly for it to work. The word used for taking your treatment properly is adherence. A common reason why...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Late drug doses

    For HIV treatment to work, you need to take it properly. This means: Taking all your doses. Taking your doses at the right time. Making sure that you...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Drug resistance

    It's important to always take your HIV treatment at the right times and in the right amounts. If you don't, HIV may become drug resistant.When...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • An HIV treatment journey

    This illustrated leaflet shows the journey a lot of people go on with HIV treatment. It involves the decision to start treatment, problems with side...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Taking drugs on time

    For HIV treatment to work well, you need to always take your pills at the right time, without missing any doses.Taking anti-HIV drugs regularly will...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Adherence

    Information on adherence to anti-HIV drugs, including advice on how patients can maintain adherence to their therapy and how healthcare providers can help....

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • Your treatment

    This booklet gives a basic, but comprehensive introduction to HIV treatment....

    From: 'Your' booklets series

    Information level Level 1

Adherence features

Adherence in your own words

Adherence news from aidsmap

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Adherence news selected from other sources

  • Only three in 10 Americans have HIV under control: government report

    Just 30 percent of Americans living with HIV have the virus in check, putting others at risk of infection, U.S. health officials said yesterday. The report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 840,000 of the 1.2 million people infected with HIV in 2011 were not consistently taking anti-HIV drugs that keep the virus suppressed at very low levels.

    26 November 2014 | Reuters
  • The Guy Who Delivers HIV Medicine On His Bicycle

    Sizwe Nzima was a high school student in Cape Town, South Africa, when he would pick up the medicine for his HIV-positive grandparents, who had difficulty traveling to the clinic themselves. Because of the long lines, Nzima usually waited hours and often made multiple trips to the clinic before and after school. So there he was, sitting on a hard wooden bench at the clinic one day about four years ago, when he had an idea: Why not start an HIV medicine delivery service?

    18 November 2014 | NPR (blog)
  • Innovation in fixed-dose combos: HIV/AIDS therapeutics edition

    FDC drug development is evolving rapidly as the industry gains experience in manufacturing them and ushering them through the review process. The laws have changed towards a more favorable marketing climate. And finally, it is clear that FDCs are more than a way to improve adherence—though that will always be a prominent consideration. FDCs can shift the standard of care towards a more tolerable, patient-friendly, value-oriented approach to treatment, and in the final analysis, that approach to development bodes well for companies, payers, and most importantly, patients.

    07 November 2014 | BioPharma Dive
  • Factors Associated With 10 Years of Continuous Viral Load Suppression on HIV Treatment

    There is no magic formula for achieving 10 years of continuous viral load suppression on antiretroviral therapy in people living with HIV -- even perfect adherence didn't improve the chances of continuously suppressed viral loads, according to a poster analysis of the U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study (NHS) cohort presented at IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia.

    29 October 2014 | TheBody.com
  • IDWeek 2014: Behavioral and Financial Incentives May Improve HIV Treatment Outcomes

    While making medications free can remove barriers to access for individuals who cannot pay for treatment, data suggest that for most people accessing care in industrialized countries, "making medications available for free or low cost will not solve problems with medication non-adherence," according to a presentation by Kevin Volpp from the University of Pennsylvania last week at IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia.

    16 October 2014 | HIVandHepatitis.com
  • Why I Refused, Then Later Embraced, HIV Treatment

    "On good days, adhering to my pill is a positive affirmation of my life, an exercise in self-love. On bad days, it's just a pill I need to swallow, not terribly bitter but as mildly annoying as having to shave or tie my shoelaces every day. It's yet another thing to add to my list of things, but I do it anyway." Josh Kruger on his ambiguous relationship to HIV treatment.

    01 October 2014 | TheBody.com
  • Exclusive: India set to run out of critical free drug for HIV/AIDS program

    India could run out of a critical medicine in its free HIV/AIDS drugs program in three weeks due to bureaucratic bungling, a senior government official said, leaving more than 150,000 sufferers without life-saving drugs for about a month.

    01 October 2014 | Reuters
  • Polypharmacy Hinders HIV Drug Adherence

    Among HIV-positive patients, concurrent use of medications is associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to research published in the Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy.

    29 September 2014 | Pharmacy Times
  • Long acting HIV drugs to be developed

    HIV drugs which only need to be taken once a month are to be developed at the University of Liverpool in a bid to overcome the problem of ‘pill fatigue’.

    15 September 2014 | University of Liverpool press release
  • Uganda: Aids Patients Reject Bitter ARVs

    The Uganda Coalition for Access to Essential Medicine (UCAEM) has asked government to withdraw and cease use of non-film coated tenofovir and lamivudine, dubbing the drug combination as notoriously bitter. "People living with HIV will more likely stop taking treatment than use this medicine," said Margaret Happy, the advocacy officer of the International Community of Women in East Africa (ICWEA).

    10 September 2014 | Allafrica.com
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.