News and information about universal access to health care; the impact of restrictive policies and financial challenges on access to treatment; drug stock-outs; and scaling up services.

Access to medicines and treatment: latest news

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Access to medicines and treatment news selected from other sources

  • Revealed: UK patients stockpile drugs in fear of no-deal Brexit

    Ministers have been urged by top doctors to reveal the extent of national drug stocks, amid growing evidence patients are stockpiling medication in preparation for a no-deal Brexit. The Royal College of Physicians (RCP), which represents tens of thousands of doctors, urged the government to be more “transparent about national stockpiles, particularly for things that are already in short supply or need refrigeration, such as insulin”.

    5 hours ago | The Guardian
  • HIV care: Karnataka bags top spot

    When it comes to providing care, support and treatment to HIV patients, Karnataka has been judged the best performer among states with a high HIV burden.

    16 January 2019 | Times of India
  • Indonesia seeks to reassure HIV patients over drug supplies

    Indonesia’s health ministry has sought to reassure HIV patients that sufficient antiretroviral (ARV) drugs will be available for their treatment after some hospitals had run out of supplies.

    14 January 2019 | Reuters
  • BASHH, BHIVA, HIVPA and NHIVNA statement on management of antiretroviral supplies in preparation for a no-deal Brexit Scenario

    Clinicians do not need to issue longer, or earlier than usual, prescriptions and patients should be reassured that there is no need for concern about the supply of their medication and therefore no need to stockpile.

    11 January 2019 | British HIV Association
  • UK-CAB statement on Brexit, HIV and access to medicines

    On 19 December 2018, the UK-CAB, an HIV treatment advocacy organisation, published recommendations to mimimise the risk for HIV positive people having an interruption in supply of medicines, due to uncertainty over plans for Brexit.

    20 December 2018 | UK-CAB
  • With no antiretrovirals, Venezuela HIV patients rely on leaf remedy

    As Venezuela’s hyperinflation and chronic medicine shortages leave HIV patients with little hope of obtaining antiretroviral drugs, many are now relying on the leaves of a tropical tree known as the guasimo.

    13 December 2018 | Reuters
  • Bringing Down the House on Intellectual Property and Access

    As the Trump administration makes noise about the high price of pharmaceuticals while doubling down on its commitment to “protect the engine of American ingenuity,” this issue of TAGline dives deep into the rhetoric and realities of intellectual property (IP) protections and the current wave of political shenanigans on critical drugs, surfacing the fundamental lies and vested interests that deny medication to those in need in the United States and around the world.

    10 December 2018 | Treatment Action Group
  • Asylum seekers in Britain unable to access healthcare

    Cost and fears about how they will be treated, or consequences for their immigration status, are preventing people seeking or refused asylum from using health services, a new report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission has found, prompting a call for greater separation of the immigration and healthcare systems.

    30 November 2018 | Equality and Human Rights Commission
  • Trump Wants to Restrict Access to HIV Meds for People on Medicare

    In a move to cut Medicare costs, the proposed changes would also affect people with cancer, depression and schizophrenia.

    29 November 2018 | Poz
  • MSF: Pharmaceutical corporations failing children with HIV

    Developing countries are struggling to provide HIV-positive children with World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended treatments because pediatric versions of HIV medicines don’t exist, are priced out of reach, or haven’t been registered in all countries that need them, said the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) ahead of a Vatican City meeting of HIV stakeholders on scaling up diagnosis and treatment for children.

    29 November 2018 | Doctors Without Borders
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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