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  • Only three in 10 Americans have HIV under control: government report

    Just 30 percent of Americans living with HIV have the virus in check, putting others at risk of infection, U.S. health officials said yesterday. The report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 840,000 of the 1.2 million people infected with HIV in 2011 were not consistently taking anti-HIV drugs that keep the virus suppressed at very low levels.

    21 hours ago | Reuters
  • Zimbabwe: Stealing Lives

    Exposing the trade in stolen drugs that is costing the lives of tens of thousands of HIV/AIDS sufferers in Zimbabwe.

    24 November 2014 | Al Jazeera (video)
  • UNAIDS reports that reaching Fast-Track Targets will avert nearly 28 million new HIV infections and end the AIDS epidemic as a global health threat by 2030

    If the world does not rapidly scale up in the next five years, the epidemic is likely to spring back with a higher rate of new HIV infections than today, UNAIDS says.

    19 November 2014 | UNAIDS
  • NHS asks Nice to delay ground-breaking hepatitis C drug

    Nice is due to finish its final assessment of sofosbuvir in January. It is usual for them to give the NHS three months to find the money or put staff – if needed – in place. NHS England is thought to have asked them to delay this by six months.

    19 November 2014 | Channel 4 News (blog)
  • Pharmaceutical Industry Doing More to Improve Access to Medicine in Developing Countries; Performance on Some Aspects Lags

    The world's leading pharmaceutical companies are doing more to improve access to medicine in developing countries, with a raft of new initiatives, scale-ups and innovations over the last two years. However, the industry struggles to perform well in some practices that matter, according to the 2014 Access to Medicine Index, published Monday. GSK tops the Index for the fourth time. This is driven by robust performance across most areas, with several innovative practices. Novo Nordisk has made the most progress, improving in five of the seven areas the Index focuses on. This has resulted in a remarkable leap from 6th to 2nd place. Sanofi and Pfizer fell down the ranking most significantly.

    18 November 2014 | Access to Medicine Index
  • South Africa: SA Can Overcome HIV Challenge - Deputy President

    South Africa has the ability and resolve to overcome the challenge of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Saturday.

    11 November 2014 | AllAfrica.com
  • HIV generics in the U.S.: Sooner or later?

    Why do we continue to spend billions of dollars for brand-name drugs that are available in cheaper generic forms in the developing world -- billions that end up as profits for pharmaceutical industry?

    10 November 2014 | The Body
  • Problems with test and treat in Thailand

    The Thai government has announced that the national policy is test and treat. There are several problems with this.

    05 November 2014 | HIV Information for Myanmar (blog)
  • UK has 'signed a death warrant' for South Africans with HIV-Aids

    One of the world’s leading Aids activists has accused Britain of “signing a death warrant” for South Africans in need of treatment after withdrawing aid from the Treatment Action Campaign, which now faces ruin.

    05 November 2014 | The Guardian
  • Bristol-Myers Plan to Widen Access to its Hep C Drug is Criticized

    “Unfortunately, history seems to be repeating itself with BMS, who hasn’t learned from the company’s poor track record responding to the HIV epidemic,” says Rohit Malpani of Doctors Without Borders.

    05 November 2014 | Wall Street Journal
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